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和訳お願いします。

I started studying Japanese language in 1974, in a Tokyo university with many other foreign students. Although the tests and lessons were well-designed, I was soon quite frustrated and dissatisfied with my progress in that situation. Most of my classmates were also non-Japanese, so the dangerous tendency was to speak in English or French outside of classes. Except for the small number who wanted to "brush up their English," the normal Japanese students refused to associate with the illiterate foreigners. I soon found that I had gravitated to a small group of Koreans and Hawaiians, who agreed to speak only in Japanese. However, I felt that my Japanese was not likely to improve much without native speakers as models. I was depressed by the number of Americans concerned only with obtaining as much money, sex, marijuana, or media-coverage as they could obtain during their year in Japan, rather than really trying to appreciate the culture in which they were guests. So I began to look around for a more isolated university which would admit and teach Japanese to foreigners, but without the problems of Tokyo's "international set."

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私は1974年に東京のある大学で他の多くの外国人学生と共に日本語の勉強を始めました。テストや授業は上手く構成されていましたが、私は間もなくそうした状況での私の進歩に失望し不満を持つようになりました。私のクラスメートの大部分も日本人ではありませんでしたので、危険な傾向は授業以外では英語やフランス語で話してしまうことでした。「自分の英語を磨くこと」を望む少数の学生を除けば、普通の日本人学生は日本語の分からない外国人と付き合うことを拒みました。私がすぐに気付いたのは、自分が韓国人やハワイ出身者の小さなグループに引き付けられたと言うことです、彼らは日本語だけで話すことに同意してくれたからです。しかし、手本となる母国語話者がいないと私の日本語があまり上達しそうにないと私は感じました。自分たちが客人となっている文化を本気で理解しようとするよりも、日本にいる間に出来るだけたくさんのお金、セックス、マリワナ、メディアへの露出を得ることにだけ関心のあるアメリカ人の数の多さに私は失望しました。それで私は外国人を受け入れて日本語を教えてくれるけれど、東京の「色々な外国人の仲間」がいるという問題を抱えていないもっと都会から離れた大学を探し始めました。

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