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I teach Japanese at community colleges outside Philadelphia in the United States The demographics of my students have completely changed in the past 10 years Until several years ago, the majority of my students were interested in commerce: they were businesspeople, lawyers and doctors. Now, the students enroll in my classes because they are interested in anime, manga, Japanese pop culture, or even video games. Some of the students are also interested in joining the Japan Exchange and Teaching Program. As a result, my classes have become more youthful. I get a completely different atmosphere from these students compared to previous ones. While most have never visited Japan, I feel I can relate to them better. The earlier students, even those who had been to Japan, didn't have as good an understanding of git. Although they often had a lot of knowledge about Japanese culture, they retained a certain detached attitude toward it. However, my new students come into the classroom listening to J-pop and toting backpacks adorned with nime characters. They informally say, "Sensei, ohayo!” On tests, they draw their favorite anime characters and after class they exchange anime DVDs and music I began to realize that these students were absorbing Japanese language and customs directly with their eyes and ears, not trying to intellectualize their experience in the way my previous students often did. Some of the kids learn Japanese intonation and grammar through anime. Of course, this creates problems at time For example, I'll teach: "Kyo wa ii tenki desu ne," and they'll respond "li tenki dayoooo. as if they were anime characters themselves charming, but somewhat inappropriate in this context. you like anime?" I inquired. A few of the many answers are: "Because One of my students said: "I find the unusual storylines refreshing in comparison with racters in anime seem it's fun! "The pictures are so pretty" "Because there's actually a plot and a story the redundant ones of American television and cinema. The characters in anime seem to be more fully developed. The characters fail, learn and grow, so I feel that I can really late. Animation may be the initial attraction for many fans, but its the creative plots and unique storylines that keep us interested

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読みやすいよう意訳しています。落ちている文字があったので適当に補いました。 私はアメリカのフィラデルフィア郊外のコミュニティカレッジで日本語を教えています。過去10年で学生のタイプが完全に変わりました。数年前まではビジネス関連で実業家や弁護士や医師だったのですが近年はアニメ・マンガ・ポップカルチャー・ゲームが好きで日本語を選択してきます。中には日本への教師交換制度に申請する人もいます。結果、クラスは若々しくなりました。 以前の学生達と比べ完全に雰囲気が変わったと感じます。ほとんどがまだ日本に行ったことがないにしても日本へのなじみ方が大きいようです。以前の学生達は訪日経験がありながらそこまで浸透していませんでした。日本文化を知識として知っていてもこころの奥では馴染んでいないのです。 しかし今の学生はJポップを聞き、ゆるキャラのリュックを背負い、アニメキャラを崇拝しています。「おはよー先生!」と挨拶してテスト用紙にはアニメキャラを落書きし、授業後にはJポップやアニメのDVDを交換するんです。以前の学生が頭で日本文化を理解するのと違って耳と目から体で直接日本の習慣や言語を吸収しているのがわかります。 アニメから日本語の発音や文法を学ぶ子もいます。するとこうなります。私が「今日はいい天気ですね」と教えても「いい天気だヨーー」と返してくるんです。アニメキャラのつもりでかわいいんでしょうけどちょっとこの場合まずいです。 「なんでアニメが好きなの?」と聞くと「ストーリーは新鮮だしキャラクターがすごくいい!」「絵がすごくきれい」「アメリカのテレビや映画にはないストーリー性があるから」 アニメの登場人物はよく性格まで考えつくされています。失敗して学習して成長する、そんなところです。アニメは見た目だけでも魅力的だけどその独創的な筋立てや奇抜な物語性で惹きつけられるのでしょう。

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