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和訳お願いします。

My father and mother go to the rail of the boardwalk and look down I the beach where a good many bathers are casually walking about. A few s in the surf. A peanut whistle pierces the air with its pleasant and active whine, and my father goes to buy peanuts. My mother remains at the rail and stares at the ocean. The ocean seems merry to her; it pointedly sparkles and again and again the pony waves are released. She notices the children digging in the wet sand, and the bathing costumes of the girls who are her own age. My father returns with the peanuts. Overhead the sun's lightnil strikes and strikes, but neither of them are at all aware of it. The boardwalk is full of people dressed in their Sunday clothes and casually strolling. The tide does not reach as far as the boardwalk, and the strollers would feel no danger if it did. My father and mother lean on the rail of the boardwalk and absently stare at the ocean. The ocean is becoming rough; the waves come in slowly, tugging strength from far back. The moment before they somersault, the moment when they arch their backs so beautifully, showing white veins in the green and black, that moment is intolerable. They finally crack, dashing fiercely upon the sand, actually driving, full force downward, against it, bouncing upward and forward, and at last petering out into a small stream of bubbles which slides up the beach and then is recalled. The sun overhead does not disturb my father and my mother. They gaze idly at the ocean, scarcely interested in its harshness. But I stare at the terrible sun which breaks up sight, and the fatal merciless passionate ocean. I forget my parents. I stare fascinated, and finally, shocked by their indifference, I burst out weeping once more. The old lady next to me pats my shoulder and says "There, there, young man, all of this is only a movie, only a movie," but I look up once more at the terrifying sun and the terrifying ocean, and being unable to control my tears I get up and go to the men's room, stumbling over the feet of the other people seated in my row.

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父と母は、板張り遊歩道の手すりのところに行き、大勢の海水浴客が歩き回っているビーチを見下ろす。波間にいる人も少しいる。ピーナッツ売りの呼び笛が快活な愛想よい響きをもって空気を抜けてくると、父はピーナッツを買いに行く。母は手すりのところに留まり、海をじっと見つめる。彼女には、海がウキウキしているように見える。それは細かくきらめき、何度も何度も、波が跳ねては飛び散り、跳ねては飛び散る。彼女は、子供が濡れた砂地に穴を掘っているのに気づく。少女たちの水着を見て、彼女はそれを着る年頃に戻る。父がピーナッツを持って戻る。 頭上からは、太陽の輝きがさんさんと降り注ぐが、彼らのどちらも全くそれに気づいていない。板張り遊歩道は、晴れ着姿の人々や偶然ぶらぶら歩きをしている人々でいっぱいである。潮の流れは板張り遊歩道のところまでは届かないが、もしそこまで来ても、散歩者は全く危険を感じないことだろう。父と母は、板張り遊歩道の手すりにもたれかかり、放心したように海を見つめる。海が荒れてきている。波がゆっくり入って来ては、勢いよく、遠くまで引いてゆく。波は、逆巻きの直前、緑と黒の中に白い縞模様を見せて、美しいアーチを描くが、その瞬間は堪えられない。最終的にそれはザザーと砕ける。荒々しく砂の上に襲いかかって、真っしぐらに砂を目指して勢いよく覆いかぶさり、上や前に跳ねあがり、そしてついには、砂浜を滑り上がってから呼び戻されて、小さな泡の流れとなって消えてゆく。頭上の太陽が、父と母を妨げることはない。彼らは、海の荒々しさにはほとんど興味を持たずに、ただぼんやりと海を見つめる。 しかし私は、視界や、致命的で無慈悲で熱狂的な海を破壊する、恐ろしい太陽を凝視する。私は両親を忘れる。心を奪われたように凝視し、そして最後に、彼らの無関心に衝撃を受けて、またもやどっと泣き崩れる。私の隣の老婦人は、私の肩を軽くたたいて、「さあ、さあ、お若い方、これみんな映画に過ぎないのよ、映画に」と言う。けれども私はまた、恐ろしい太陽や恐ろしい海を仰ぎ見る。そして、涙を抑えることができず、トイレに行こうと立ち上がるが、同じ座席の列に座っている人の足につまずいてしまう。

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