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和訳お願いします。

As their dinner goes on, my father tells of his plans for the future, and mother shows with expressive face how interested she is, and how impressed. My father becomes exultant, lifted up by the waltz that is being played, and his own future begins to intoxicate him. My father tells my mother that he is going to expand his business, for there is a great deal of money to be made. He wants to settle down. After all, he is twenty-nine, he has lived by himself since his thirteenth year, he is making more and more money, and he is envious of his friends when he visits them in the security of their homes, surrounded, it seems, by the calm domestic pleasures, and by delightful children, and then as the waltz reaches the moment when the dancers all swing madly,then, then with awful daring, then he asks my mother to marry him, although awlnvardly enough and puzzled as to how he had arrived at the question, and she, to make the whole business worse, begins to cry, and my father looks nervously about, not knowing at all what to do now, and my mother says, "It's all I've wanted from the first moment I saw you," sobbing, and he fin& all of this very difficult, scarcely to his taste, scarcely as he thought it would be, on his long walks over Brooklyn Bridge in the revery of a fine cigar, and it was then, at that point, that I stood up in the theatre and shouted: "Don't do it! It's not too late to change your minds, both of you. Nothing good will come of it, only remorse, hatred, scandal, and two children whose characters are monstrous." The whole audience turned to look at me, annoyed, the usher came hurrying down the aisle flashing his searchlight, and the old lad next to me tugged me down into my seat, saying: "Be quiet. You'll be put ou4 and you paid thirty-five cents'to come in." And so I shut my eyes becausex could not bear to see what was happening. I sat there quietly.

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  • 回答No.2
  • Nakay702
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夕食が進む途中で、父が将来の計画を話すと、母はそれにとても興味があり、とても感動的だということを表情豊かに示す。父は有頂天になり、鳴っているワルツによって高揚し、自分自身の未来に陶酔し始める。父は母に、大金が稼げるはずだから、仕事を拡大するつもりであることを告げる。彼は身を固めたいのである。 何といっても、彼は今29歳で、13歳のときから一人暮しをしている。彼は金をしこたま稼ごうとしている。静かで家庭的な喜びや、陽気な子供たちに囲まれて、自分の家で安穏としている友達を訪問する時、その友達が羨ましくなるのだ。さてもワルツは、踊り手が猛烈この上なく揺れ動くような局面に至る。そこで父は、またとないような勇気を奮い起こして、ただし、恐ろしいほどぎこちなく母に求婚する。しかも、どのような仕方でその問題(求婚)に至ったかは分からないままだった。母は泣き出してしまい、全ての事柄を台無しにしてしまう。で父は、今度は何をすべきか全く分からず、びくびくしながら辺りを見る。母はむせび泣きながら、「それは、最初にあなたと会ったときから望んでいたことです」と言う。それで、父はこの全てがとても難しいことで、彼の好みにも合わず、ブルックリン橋を延々歩きながら、上等な葉巻をくゆらしつつ幻想の中で想定したこととはほとんど合わないことを知る。そして、その時である。私は劇場の中で立ち上がって叫んだ。「そんなことはやめてくれ! 二人とも、考えを変えても遅くはないよ。そんなことから良いものは何も出てこないよ。(出てくるのは)せいぜい、後悔、憎悪、醜聞、ひどい性格の二人の子供たちだけだ。」全観客が、苛立って振り向き、私を睨んだ。客席案内人が懐中電灯をつけて、急いで通路を降りて私のところに来た。そして、私の隣席の男が私を座席に押しつけて言った。「静かにしろ。つまみ出されるぞ。入場料を35セントも払ったんだろ。」それで、私は目を閉じた。なぜなら、目の前で起きていることを見るのは耐えられなかったからだ。私はそこに静かに座り込んだ。

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  • 和訳お願いします。

    My father thinks of my mother, of how lady-like she is, and of the pride which will be his when he introduces her to his family. They are not yet engaged and he is not yet sure that he loves my mother, so that, once in a while, he becomes panicky about the bond already established. But then he reassures himself by thinking of the big men he admires who are married: William Randolph Hearst and William Howard Taft, who has just become the President of the United States.   My father arrives at my mother's house. He has come too early and so is suddenly embarrassed. My aunt, my mother's younger sister, answers the loud bell with her napkin in her hand, for the family is still at dinner. As my father enters, my grandfather rises from the table qnd shakes hands with him. My mother has run upstairs to tidy herself. My grandmother asks my father if he has had dinner and tells him that my mother will be down soon. My grandfather opens the conversation by remarking about the mild June weather. My father sits uncomfortably near the table, holding his hat in his hand. My grandmother tells my aunt to take my father's hat. My uncle, twelve years old, runs into the house, his hair tousled. He shouts a greeting to my father, who has often given him nickels, and then runs upstairs, as my grandmother shouts after him. It is evident that the respect in which my father is held in this house is tempered by a good deal of mirth. He is impressive, but also very awkward.

  • 和訳お願いします。

    Finally my mother comes downstairs and my father, being at the moment engaged in conversation with my grandfather, is made uneasy by her entrance, for he does not know whether to greet my mother or to continue the conversation. He gets up from his chair clumsily and says "Hello" gruffly. My grandfather watches this, examining their congruence, such as it is, with a critical eye, and meanwhile rubbing his bearded cheek roughly, as he always does when he reasons. He is worried; he is afraid that my father will not make a good husband for his oldest daughter. At this point something happens to the film, just as my father says something funny to my mother: I am awakened to myself and my unhappiness just as my interest has become most intense. The audience begins to clap impatiently. Then the trouble is attended to, but the film has been returned to a portion just shown, and once more I see my grandfather rubbing his bearded cheek, pondering my father's character. It is difficult to get back into the picture once more and forget myself, but as my mother giggles at my father's words, the darkness drowns me. My father and mother depart from the house, my father shaking hands with my grandfather once more, out of some unknown uneasiness. I stir uneasily also, slouched in the hard chair'of the theatre. Where is the older uncle, my mother's older brother? He is studying in his bedroom upstairs, studying for his final examinations at the College of the City of New York, having been dead of double pneumonia for the last twenty-one years. mother and father walk down the same quiet streets once more. My mot is holding my father's arm and telling him of the novel she has been read and my father utters judgments of the characters as the plot is made clea~ him. This is a habit which he very much enjoys, for he feels the utm superiority and confidence when he is approving or condemning the beh ior of other people. At times he feels moved to utter a brief "Ugh," whene the story becomes what he would call sugary. This tribute is the assertion his manliness. My mother feels satisfied by the interest she has awaken and she is showing my father how intelligent she is and how interesting.

  • 和訳お願いします。

    They have passed a fortune-teller's booth and my mother wishes to go in, but my father does not. They begin to argue about it. My mother becomes stubborn, my father once more impatient. What my father would like to do now is walk off and leave my mother there, but he knows that that would never do. My mother refuses to budge. She is near tears, but she feels an uncontrollable desire to hear what the palm reader will say. My father consents angrily and they both go into the booth which is, in a way, like the photographer's, since it is draped in black cloth and its light is colored and shadowed. The place is too warm, and my father keeps saying that this is all nonsense, pointing to the crystal ball on the table. The fortune-teller, a short, fat woman garbed in robes supposedly exotic, comes into the room and greets them, speaking with an accent. But suddenly my father feels that the whole thing is intolerable; he tugs at my mother's arm but my mother refuses to budge. And then, in terrible anger, my father lets go of my mother's arm and strides out, leaving my mother stunned. She makes a movement as if to go after him, but the fortune-teller holds her and begs her not to do so, and I in my seat in the darkness am shocked and horrified.

  • 回答No.1

夢を見ているので、シーンの連続性は合理的ではありません。 また、劇中表現と同じで、現在形になっています。 最後だけは過去形になっており、その部分は、夢から覚める前後のように思います As their dinner goes on, (レストランでの)夕食が進むと、 my father tells of his plans for the future, 父は将来の計画を話し、 and mother shows with expressive face 母は表情を表す。 how interested she is, and how impressed. それはいかに興味がありいかに印象的かを示す表情だ。 My father becomes exultant, 父は有頂天になり、 lifted up by the waltz that is being played, 鳴っているワルツによって持ち上げられる。 and his own future begins to intoxicate him. そして彼自身の未来は彼を酔わせ始める。 My father tells my mother that he is going to expand his business, 父は母にビジネスを拡大する予定だと告げる。 for there is a great deal of money to be made. 稼げるはずの巨大な金額が存在するからだ。 He wants to settle down. かれは居を定めたい。 After all, he is twenty-nine, 彼は29歳だ。 he has lived by himself since his thirteenth year, 彼は13歳から一人で住んでいる。 he is making more and more money, かれは多くの金を稼ぐ 。 and he is envious of his friends かれは友達をうらやましがる、 when he visits them in the security of their homes, 家の安全の中にいる友達を訪問する時にだ。 surrounded, it seems, by the calm domestic pleasures, and by delightful children, それらの家庭は、静かな家庭的喜びと陽気な子供に囲まれている。 then the waltz reaches the moment when the dancers all swing madly then, レストランで鳴っているワルツは全ダンサーが狂ったように威勢よく動き回る シーンに到達する。 then with awful daring, then he asks my mother to marry him, 恐ろしいほどの勇気を持って、父は母に求婚する。 although awkwardly enough でも、十分にぎこちなく、 and puzzled as to how he had arrived at the question, かつ、 どのような道筋でその疑問に到達したかを疑問に思いながらだ。 and she, to make the whole business worse, begins to cry, 母は全ての努力を悪化させるべく泣き始める。 and my father looks nervously about, not knowing at all what to do now, 父は今何をすべきかを知らず、神経質にあたりを見る。 and my mother says, 母は言う、 "It's all I've wanted from the first moment I saw you," sobbing, 「それはあなたを最初に見たときからずっと望んでいた言葉だ」と涙ぐみながら。 and he finds all of this 父はこの全てがこうであると見つける、 very difficult, scarcely to his taste, scarcely as he thought it would be, すなわち、困難で彼の好みに合わず、思っていた結果とほとんど合わないと、 on his long walks over Brooklyn Bridge ブルックリン橋のを長く歩いて、 in the revery of a fine cigar, 葉巻の幻想の中で。 and it was then, at that point, そしてその時だ that I stood up in the theatre and shouted: 私は劇場の中で立ち上がり叫んだ "Don't do it! やめろ It's not too late to change your minds, both of you. 考えを変えても遅くない、二人よ、 Nothing good will come of it, それ(結婚)から良いことは何も生まれない、 only remorse, hatred, scandal, and-two children whose characters are monstrous." 生まれるのは、憎しみ、醜聞、ひどい性格の二人の子供たちだけだ。 The whole audience turned to look at me, annoyed, 煩がって、全聴衆が振り向き、私を見た the usher came hurrying down the aisle flashing his searchlight, 客席案内人が懐中電灯を光らせて私のところに来た and the old lad next to me tugged me down into my seat, 私の隣の老いたごろつきが私を座席に押し付けた saying: こう言いながら "Be quiet. 静かにしろ、 You'll be put out 放り出されるぞ、 and you paid thirty-five cents' to come in." お前は入るのに35セント支払ったではないか ここはよく解りません。 35セントでは劇場には入れないと思います。ので夢から覚めた And so I shut my eyes だから私は目を閉じた because could not bear to see what was happening. なぜなら、何が起きるかを見るのは耐えられなかったからだ I sat there quietly. 私はそこに静かに座った

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  • 日本語のセンスのある方和訳をお願いします

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