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和訳お願いします。

My father thinks of my mother, of how lady-like she is, and of the pride which will be his when he introduces her to his family. They are not yet engaged and he is not yet sure that he loves my mother, so that, once in a while, he becomes panicky about the bond already established. But then he reassures himself by thinking of the big men he admires who are married: William Randolph Hearst and William Howard Taft, who has just become the President of the United States.   My father arrives at my mother's house. He has come too early and so is suddenly embarrassed. My aunt, my mother's younger sister, answers the loud bell with her napkin in her hand, for the family is still at dinner. As my father enters, my grandfather rises from the table qnd shakes hands with him. My mother has run upstairs to tidy herself. My grandmother asks my father if he has had dinner and tells him that my mother will be down soon. My grandfather opens the conversation by remarking about the mild June weather. My father sits uncomfortably near the table, holding his hat in his hand. My grandmother tells my aunt to take my father's hat. My uncle, twelve years old, runs into the house, his hair tousled. He shouts a greeting to my father, who has often given him nickels, and then runs upstairs, as my grandmother shouts after him. It is evident that the respect in which my father is held in this house is tempered by a good deal of mirth. He is impressive, but also very awkward.

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父は、母のことについて、彼女がどれほど女性らしいか、彼女を家族に紹介する時の、彼の誇らしさについて考える。彼らはまだ婚約していないし、私の母を愛しているという確信が彼にはないので、それで時折彼はすでに結ばれている絆について不安に思ったりすることになる。しかしそういう時彼は、賞賛する既婚の偉人に自分自身をなぞらえてみる。すなわち、ウィリアム・ランドルフ・ハーストやウィリアム・ハワード・タフトで、彼らはつい最近米国の大統領になった人たちである。 父が母の家に到着する。彼はあまり早くに着いたので、突然当惑してしまう。家族はまだ夕食の最中なので、母の妹である叔母がナプキンを持ったままけたたましい呼び鈴に応える。父が入ってくると、祖父がテーブルから立ち上がって握手する。母は、身なりを整えるため二階へ駆け上がった。祖母が、父に夕食は済んだかどうかを尋ねたり、すぐ母が降りて来るからなどと伝えたりしている。祖父は、穏やかな6月の天候について触れたりしながら会話を始める。 父は帽子を手に持ったまま、不安そうな面持ちでテーブルの近くに座る。祖母が、父の帽子を受け取るよう叔母に言う。私の叔父、12歳が、髪をくしゃくしゃにしたまま家に駆け込む。後ろから祖母に呼びとめられると、彼は大声で父に挨拶し、二階へ駆け上がる。父はしばしば彼に5セント銅貨をあげていたのだ。この家の人が父に抱いていた尊敬の念が、そんなこんなの騒ぎで中和された、ということは明らかだ。彼は、印象的な人ではあるけれども、同時にまた、とてもぎこちないのである。

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