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Shocked to hear that his friend was waiting for a heart transplant,Robert Test decided to become an organ donor. This is what he wrote about his decision. At a certain moment,a doctor will decide that my brain has stopped functioning. When that happens, do not attempt to revive my body by the use of a machine. Give my eyes to a man who has never seen a sunrise,a baby's face, or love in the eyes of a woman. Give my heart to a person whose own heart has caused him nothing but days of endless pain. Give my blood to a teenager who was seriously injured in a traffic accident,so that he or she might live and see his or her grandchildren playing.

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  • 回答No.2
  • Agee
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>Shocked to hear that his friend was waiting for a heart transplant,Robert Test >decided to become an organ donor. This is what he wrote about his decision. 【カンマやピリオドの後には必ず半角スペースを置くのが原則です】 「友人が心臓移植手術を待っていると聞いてショックを受けたRobert Testは、臓器提供者になる決意をした。以下は彼の決意を記した文章である」 >At a certain moment,a doctor will decide that my brain has stopped functioning. 「ある時点で、医師は私の脳が機能停止したと判断するだろう」 >When that happens, do not attempt to revive my body by the use of a machine. 「そうなったら、私の身体を機器によって蘇生させないでほしい」 >Give my eyes to a man who has never seen a sunrise,a baby's face, or love in the eyes of a woman. 「私の眼を日の出や赤ちゃんの顔や女性の目に愛を見たことのない男に与えてほしい」 >Give my heart to a person whose own heart has caused him nothing but days of endless pain. 「私の心臓は、毎日絶え間なく痛み続ける心臓を持つ人に上げてほしい」 >Give my blood to a teenager who was seriously injured in a traffic accident,so that he or she >might live and see his or her grandchildren playing. 「私の血液は交通事故で重傷を負った十代の人に上げてほしい。そうすれば、彼なり彼女なりは生き延びて、彼らの孫が遊ぶ姿を見ることが出来るかも知れないからである」

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  • 回答No.1
  • osal
  • ベストアンサー率30% (4/13)

彼の友人が心臓移植を待っていたと聞いてショックを受けて、ロバートTestは、臓器提供者になると決めました。 これは、彼が彼の決定に関して書いたものです。 ある瞬間に、医師は、私の脳が、機能するのを止めたと決めるでしょう。 それが起こるときには、マシンの使用で私の身体を蘇らせるのを試みないでください。 女性の目で日の出、赤ん坊の顔、または愛に一度も遭遇したことがない男性に私の目を与えてください。 自己の心臓が何日もの無限の痛みだけを彼に引き起こした人に私の心臓を与えてください。 交通事故で重傷を負ったティーンエイジャーに私の血液を与えてください、その人が、生きていて、その人の孫がプレーしているのを見ることができるように。

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    臓器提供やドナーカードなどについての話です。 文の途中に、 Give my eyes to a man who has never seen a sunrise, a baby's face,or love in the eyes of a woman. Give my heart to a person whose own heart has caused him nothing but days of pain without end. Give my blood to a teenager who was seriously injured in a traffic accident,so that he or she might live and see his or her grandchildren playing. Give my kidneys to one who has to depend on a machine to live from week to week. …という、「何を何のためにどうして欲しい」という形の文が続いているところがあります。 私なりに途中まで訳してみたのですが、最初の文は「日の出、赤ん坊の顔、あるいは女性の目の中に愛を見たことのない男性に私の目をあげてください。」となりました。 なんとなく言いたいことはわかるのですが、”女性の目の中に愛を見る”という表現ではおかしいでしょうか? 二つ目の文はよく意味がわかりませんでした。 三つ目の文は、「交通事故の中で重傷だったティーンエイジャーに私の血液を与えてください。」で、そのあとどう訳せば良いのかわかりません。 最後の訳ですが、week to weekという表現はどう訳すべきなのでしょうか?最初、「何周間も、生きるために機械に頼らなければならない人に私の腎臓をあげてください」と訳したのですが…。 長くなってしまいましたが、何方がところどころでも良いので教えてくださると幸いです。

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