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question:I have difficulty sleeping at night and often find that it takes me two hours to nod off. Yet when I travel as a passenger in a car, bus or train, I find that I can fall asleep in minutes, often without intending to, and even while listening to music. I have woken up at the end of a journey only to fall into bed and be unable to sleep. Why is it that the quiet, relaxing and comfortable environment of a bed is less likely to let me sleep? answer:I too used to suffer from the 'fall asleep anywhere except in bed' syndrome. My idea was that it was mostly caused by my state of mind. When traveling, the noise and warmth can help sleepiness occurーtogether with the fact that one is usually not supposed to be doing anything. However, at bedtime it seemed that my mind would start some serious thinking because there was nothing to disturb me. That, together with the anxiety of looking at the clock past midnight, giving notice of another sleepless night, would keep me awake.

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  • sayshe
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質問: 私は夜なかなか眠れません、しばしば、ウトウトするのに私には2時間かかると思います。 しかし、車、バス、電車の乗客として旅行するとき、しばしばそのつもりはなくても、私は数分で寝入ることができると思います、また、音楽を聞いている時でさえ、寝入ると思います。 私は、旅行の終わりに目を覚まして、ベッドに入り、結局、眠ることができないだけなのです。 ベッドの静かで、リラックスして快適な環境が私を眠らせそうにないのは一体なぜなのでしょうか? 答え: 私も、以前『ベッドを除いてどこでも寝入る』症候群に苦しんだものです。 私の考えは、それが大部分は私の精神状態に起因するというものでした。 旅行するとき、騒音と暖かさが、人が通常、何かをするとは考えられていないことと相まって、眠気を起こす助けとなります。 しかし、就寝時刻には、私の邪魔をするものが何もないので、私の心が何か重大な考えを始めるように思われました。 そのことが、また眠れない夜になることを知らせる、真夜中を過ぎた時計を見る不安と相まって、私を眠らせてくれないのでした。

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