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お願いします (7) Ever the fastidious record keepers, Egyptians registered the child's name. All births, marriages, and deaths were recorded by the diligent scribes. Just as marriage required only a simple announcement to the proper authorities, so it was with a new child. To register a child the parents merely had to say something like what one princess said: "I gave birth to this baby that you see, who was named Merab and whose name was entered into the registers of the House of Life." (8) For the first three years a mother carried her baby around in a sling. One scribe tells children they should be appreciative. "Repay your mother for all her care. Give her as much bread as the needs, and carry her as she carried you, for you were a heavy burden to her." Breastfeeding for those first three years protected children from parasites in the drinking water. Digestive diseases were the most common illnesses for children. Mothers of sick children might recite this spell to ward off the evil spirit they thought to be the root of the problem: "Come on out, visitor from the darkness.... Have you come to do it harm? I forbid this! I have made ready for its protection a potion from the poisonous afat herb, from garlic which is bad for you, from honey which is sweet for the living but bitter for the dead."

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(7) 常に細心の注意を払う記録魔なので、エジプト人は、子供の名前を登録しました。 出生、結婚、死は、全て、勤勉な書記によって記録されました。 結婚が、取り扱う役所にただ申告するだけでよかったのとまったく同じように、新しい子供の登録も簡単でした。子供を登録するために、両親は、ただ、ある王女が言った次の様なことを言いさえすれば良かったのでした: 「あなたが今目にしているこの赤ちゃんを私は産みました、この子の名前は『メラブ』です、そして、その名前は、『命の館』に登録されました。」 (8) 最初の3年間、母親は、彼女の赤ちゃんを吊りひもにつるして連れ歩きました。 ある書記が、子供たちは有難いと思わなければならないと子供たちに言っています。 「あなたの母がしてくれたすべての世話に対して報いなさい。 彼女が必要とするだけのパンを与えなさい、そして、彼女があなたを連れ歩いた様に、彼女を連れ歩いてあげなさい。なぜならば、あなたは彼女にとって重い負担だったのだから。」その最初の3年間母乳で育てることは、飲料水の中にいる寄生虫から子供たちを保護しました。 消化器の病気は、子供たちが最もよくかかる病気でした。 病気の子供たちの母親は、病気の原因であると思われる悪魔を追い払うために、次のようなまじないを唱えたかも知れません:「出て行け、闇からの訪問者 .... 害をなすためにやって来たのか? そんなことは禁じます! 御加護を得るために、私は、毒のあるアファトの薬草、そなたにとって悪いニンニク、生者にとっては甘いが、死者にとっては苦い蜂蜜から取った薬を用意しました。」

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