• ベストアンサー
  • すぐに回答を!

日本語訳を!!

お願いします (5) The Roman historian Livy had also written down a different legend about two brothers who were sons of the king. Their names were Numitor and Amulius. When their father the king died, Amulius grabbed the throne and forced Numitor to leave the kingdom. But then Amulius worried that someone might try to overthrow him. What if Numitor's daughter, Rhea Silvia, had children who might try to take the throne? Amulius wasn't taking any chances. He forced Rhea Silvia to join the Vestal Virgins―a group of women who served in the temple of the goddess Vesta. The Romans believed that Vesta wanted the complete attention of her priestesses, so the Vestal Virgins were not allowed to marry or have children. (6) Poor Rhea had no choice but to obey her uncle. But things didn't go according to Amulius's plan. Somehow, despite her protected life among the Vestal Virgins, Rhea became pregnant and gave birth to twins―two strong, handsome boys. She named her sons Romulus and Remus. Amulius was outraged when he heard the news. He ordered his servants to take the twins from their mother's arms nd drown them in the river. Rhea herself was bound and thrown into prison. (7) The servant couldn't bring himself to kill the babies, so he put them into a basket and set it afloat on the river. He was sure that the babies would be carried away and drowned as the king had commanded. But the river was kind and gently landed the basket on solid ground. (8) Although the twins didn't drown, they were still in great danger. If they didn't starve, wild animals might eat them. Miraculously, according to Livy, “a she-wolf, coming down from the... hill to quench her thirst, turned her steps towards the cry of the infants, and nursed them so gently that the keeper of the royal flock found her licking them with her tongue.”

共感・応援の気持ちを伝えよう!

  • 英語
  • 回答数1
  • 閲覧数201
  • ありがとう数1

質問者が選んだベストアンサー

  • ベストアンサー
  • 回答No.1
  • sayshe
  • ベストアンサー率77% (4555/5904)

(5)ローマの歴史家リヴィは、また、王の息子だった2人の兄弟について異なる伝説を書き記しました。彼らの名前はヌミトルとアムーリウスでした。彼らの父親の王が死んだとき、アムーリウスが、王位を奪って、ヌミトルに王国を去ることを余儀なくさせました。しかし、その後、アムーリウスは、誰かが彼を打倒しようとするかもしれないと心配しました。 ヌミトルの娘、レア・シルビアに、王位を継ごうとするかもしれない子供が出来たらどうなるでしょう? アムーリウスは、運任せにはしませんでした。彼は、レア・シルビアにヴェスタの乙女 ― 女神ヴェスタの神殿に仕える一団の女性たち ― に加わることを強いました。ローマ人は、ベスタが彼女の尼僧たちの申し分のない世話を要求すると信じていたので、ヴェスタの乙女は、結婚したり子供をもうけることが許されませんでした。 (6)可哀相なレアは、彼女の叔父に従わざるを得ませんでした。しかし、事態は、アムーリウスの計画通りにはいきませんでした。どういうわけか、ヴェスタの乙女たちの中での彼女の保護された生活にもかかわらず、レアは妊娠し、双子 ― 2人の丈夫で、ハンサムな男の子 ― を出産しました。彼女は、彼女の息子たちをロムルスとレムスと名付けました。アムーリウスは、この知らせを聞いたとき激怒しました。彼は、その双子を彼らの母親の腕から奪い去り、彼らを川で溺れさせるように彼の召使に命じました。レア自身も、縛りあげられ、投獄されました。 (7)その召使は、二人の赤ん坊を殺す気になれませんでした、それで、彼は、二人をかごに入れて、川に浮かべました。二人の赤ん坊は、流れに運び去られ、王が、命じた様におぼれ死ぬだろうとその召使は、確信しました。しかし、川は、親切で、優しく、その籠をしっかりとした大地に打ち上げました。 (8)双子は溺れませんでしたが、彼らは、依然として、大変危険な状況にありました。彼らが、飢え死にしないとしても、野生動物が、彼らを食べるかもしれません。奇跡的に、リヴィによると、「雌のオオカミが、のどの渇きをいやすために丘から降りて来て、彼女の歩みをその幼子たちの叫び声に向け、王家の番人が、オオカミが舌で幼子たちをなめていると気付くほど、彼らをとても優しく世話しました。」

共感・感謝の気持ちを伝えよう!

質問者からのお礼

ありがとうございます。

関連するQ&A

  • want to have toの日本語訳について

    こんにちは。 Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire [UK,adult版] p.751真ん中あたりの文についてです。 Harry nodded. A kind of numbness and a sense of complete unreality were upon him, but he did not care; he was even glad of it. He didn't want to have to think about anything that had happened since he had first touched the Triwizard Cup. ここで "He didn't want to have to think about anything that had happened since he had first touched the Triwizard Cup." の日本語訳は "優勝杯に触れてから起こったことについて何も考えたくなかった。" となっているのですが、なぜ「didn't want to have to think about 」が「について何も考えたくなかった」となるのでしょうか? 「didn't want to think about 」との違いを教えていただけないでしょうか? よろしくお願いします。

  • 日本語訳を!!

    お願いします (23) In 31 BCE, Octavian's navy defeated Mark Antony in Greece. Morale sank among Antony's troops. Many soldiers deserted and joined Octavian. Supplies of food and water grew scarce for Antony's army. His forces suffered a fatal blow when Octavian crushed them in the Battle of Actium, a city on the western coast of Greece. Cleopatra, seeing the disaster from a distance, ordered her ships to return to Egypt. Antony saw her purple sails in retreat and ordered his sailors to follow. But Antony's ground forces continued to fight. They couldn't believe at first that their beloved leader had abandoned them. When they realized it was true, they simply laid down their weapons and surrendered. (24) The final battle between Antony and Octavian began near Alexandria on the first of August, 30 BCE. Antony ordered his fleet to attack, and his men obediently rowed toward the enemy ships. Then, instead of attacking, they saluted the enemy's leader: Octavian. Antony's cavalry deserted as well. Only the foot soldiers remained loyal to their general, but they were easily defeated. (25) Antony was infuriated that Cleopatra had ordered her troops to abandon the battle and return to Egypt. Plutarch writes that the defeated general “retreated into Alexandria, crying out in his rage that Cleopatra had betrayed him to the very men he had fought for her sake.” Cleopatra, fearing her lover's anger, hid in a huge, two-story tomb and sent a servant to tell Antony that she was dead. (26) When Antony heard the news, he was devastated. He said he had no reason to live. The war was lost and Cleopatra was dead. So he stabbed himself, by falling on his own sword. He was dying, but not yet dead, whenCleopatra's second messenger arrived, inviting Antony to come to her hiding place. The queen was alive after all. She had changed her mind and wanted to see Antony. But it was almost too late.

  • 日本語訳を!!

    お願いします (1) All Rome knew Lucretia for her beauty and goodness. No one doubted that she loved her husband and was faithful to him. In the eyes of the average Roman, this made her a perfect woman. But to Sextus. the king's ruthless son, Lucretia's goodness was a challenge. As the Roman historian Livy tells the tale, Sextus couldn't see such perfect devotion without wanting to destroy it. Sextus went to Lucretia's house when he knew that her husband was out of town. Because Sextus was a prince and also her husband's cousin, Lucretia and her servants welcomed him and served him dinner. They didn't suspect his cruel plan. (2) When everyone else was asleep, Sextus crept, sword in hand, into Lucretia's bedroom. He threatened to kill her and spread a rumor that she had been unfaithful to her husband, if she refused to do what he wanted. Lucretia was not afraid of death, but she didn't want to die with her husband thinking that she hadn't been faithful to him. So she obeyed Sextus―she felt that she had no choice. (3) The next morning, overcome with grief and shame, Lucretia sent messengers to her husband and her father. She asked them to come right away―something terrible had happened. The men came as quickly as they could. Lucretia's husband brought along his friend Brutus. When Lucretia saw them, she began to cry and told them what Sextus had done. According to Livy, she said,“Give me your right hand in faith that you will not allow the guilty to escape.” (4) Lucretia's husband and Brutus believed in Lucretia's innocence and promised to get even with Sextus. Brutus made this solemn promise.“By this blood, which was so pure...I swear before you, O gods, to chase out the king...with his criminal wife and all their children,...and never to tolerate kings in Rome evermore.”

  • 日本語訳を!!

    お願いします (13) By 50 BCE, the Triumvirate had ended. Crassus had been killed in battle, and Pompey had become very jealous of Caesar's military success and his great popularity. Pompey had married Caesar's daughter, Julia, but when she died in childbirth, the bond between the two men was broken. Before Caesar returned from Gaul, Pompey sided wit the Senate to declare his former father-in-law an enemy of the State. The Senate demanded that Caesar give up his army and return to Rome. Knowing that he would be arrested if he obeyed, he refused. But now his life and career were at stake. Did he dare go back to Italy at all? (14) In January of 49 BCE, Caesar's forces were camped just north of the Rubicon, the river that marked the boundary between Gaul and Ital. As soon as Caesar heard the Senate's ruling, he slipped away from the camp with a few trusted men. It was night, and everyone else was feasting. No one noticed that he was missing. When he reached the banks of the Rubicon, he paused, thinking about his next step. After a moment, he declared, “The die is cast” and crossed the river. This was his way of saying that his mind was made up and wouldn't be changed. Now he was ready to meet his former ally, the great general Pompey, in battle. (15) Caesar was never one to stand around, waiting for someone else to do something. Decisive as always, he began his march right away. He set out in the dead of winter with a single legion of soldiers. He knew that by marching on Rome he would start a civil war. What he didn't know─and couldn't have known─was that this war would last for nearly two decades and destroy the Republic.

  • 16-1日本語訳

    お願いします。  It was the summer of 327 BCE,and Ambhi,king of Taxila,was not a happy camper.For one thing,Taxila was no longer as powerful and wealthy as it had been when the Persians ruled there.He was glad the Persians had gone,of course.Every once in a while,they'd send someone around asking for taxes,but as long as he paid them,the Persians pretty much left King Ambhi and his people alone.Nevertheless,he probably wished that the powerful Persians army was still in town.He could have used its help.Taxila's neighbor to the southeast,King Porus,was a brave and intelligent man who wanted Ambhi's kingdom for himself.  Still,the gossip was that the Persian army itself had fallen on hard times.Some young Greek felkow named Sikander had popped up out of nowhere-Macedonia,actually,but that was as good as nowhere-and was busily conquering the whole world.The rumor was that this Sikanddr character had never lost a battle.Of course,you couldn't believe everything you heard.A young boy still in his 20s couldn't possibly have conquered everything from the Nile River to Afghanistan,not to mention the mighty Persians-but still...the stories might be true.  King Ambhi's heart must have sunk when a messenger arrived with news of the horrible defeat of one of Taxila's neighbors.When the Greek Sikander and his troops had arrived in his kingdom,the neighboring king had foolishly tried to fight.But resistance had been futile.Not only had the king lost,but his city had been burned and looted.And that,the messenger would have told King Ambhi,was no rumor.He'd seen the terrible scene himself.Now Sikander's army was on the move again.Next stop:Taxila.  For one desperate moment,King Ambhi must have wished that he and his people could somehow jump out of Sikander's way.And then he realized that,in a way,they could.

  • 16-3日本語訳

    お願いします。  At first,King Ambhi's plan seemed to have worked.Alexander marched on,leaving Taxila intact.When he got to the Jhelum River,the border between King Ambhi and Porus,Alexander demanded that Porus surrender at once.Porus,safe on the other side,refused.It was too hot to fight,and the river,rising from melting snow,was too dangerous to cross.At this time of the year,there was no grass for the army's horses and oxen,and villagers had no rice or wheat to spare for soldiers.Besides,the monsoon was expected soon,and no sensible person would try fighting during the huge rainstorms that were on their way.It was pointless.Once it started raining,everything was so muddy that horses and chariots got stuck and were useless.Only the elephants could get through,and even they wouldn't be much help.The archers the elephants carried would have ahard time shooting with wet,soggy bow strings.  But Alexander had not come as far as he had to be stopped by a river or a little rain.He sent small bands of men out at night to trick Porus into thinking he was crossing the river.According to one story,Porus sent his troops to meet them,only to find out that no one was there.When Alexander and his men finally did attack,during a heavy rainstorm,the battle lasted for more than eight hourr.Thousands of warriors(including both of Porus's sons)were kilked or wounded,along with their horses and elephants.Porus himself was badly wounded,too.But he was just as stubborn as Alexander and,wounded or not,he led a charge against the Greeks.  By the end of the day,both armies were exhausted,and Alexander called a truce.According to a Persian poem,Shah Nama,written by the poet Firdausi 1,600 years later,Alexander told Porus:

  • 日本語訳を!(14)

    お願いします (1) What we know about how Egypt got along with its neighbors came to us quite by accident. In 1887 a peasant woman was poking through the ruins of an ancient city we now call Amarna. She was collecting the crumbled remains of mud bricks, which make excellent fertilizer. Digging through the rubble she came across a stash of tablets. The hunks of sun-dried clay looked more like dog biscuits a chicken had pecked than treasure, but the woman collected the unbroken ones on the off chance she could get a few small coins for them. She gathered as many as she could carry and sold them to her neighbor. The neighbor turned around and sold them for a slight profit to a local dealer in antiquities. No one knew what they were, or if they had any value. (2) Rumors of this odd discovery spread. Museum curators in the major European cities were curious. Were these tablets ancient? Were they records of some sort? Or was this just another money-making hoax? The curators sent scouts to Egypt to find out. The scouts had orders to buy as many tablets as they could if they turned out to be genuine. The British Museum sent Budge. (3) E.A. Wallis Budge knew the tablets were in the hands of native dealers, but just who those dealers were would not be easy to find out. Government officials in the Egyptian antiquities department had announced plans to seize the tablets and throw anyone connected to them in jail. The dealers weren't about to give up the tablets for nothing, and they didn't intend to go to prison either. Threats only made them stubborn. What tablets? They didn't know anything about tablets found at Amarna. The Egyptian official in charge, Monsieur Grebaut, just threatened louder. Anyone refusing to co-operate would be tortured. The dealers didn't trust anyone. Budge hoped he could draw them out. Today reputabld museums do not buy looted antiquities, but back in Budge's day that was how things were frequently done.

  • 日本語訳お願いします。

    Going to the shore on the first morning of the vacation, Jerry stopped and looked at a wild and rocky bay, and then over to the crowded beach he knew so well from other years. His mother looked back at him. “Are you tired of the usual beach, Jerry?” “Oh, no!” he said quickly, but then said, “I’d like to look at those rocks down there.” “Of course, if you like.” Jerry watched his mother go, then ran straight into the water and began swimming. He was a good swimmer. He swam out over the gleaming sand and then he was in the real sea. He saw some older, local boys — men, to him — sitting on the rocks. One smiled and waved. It was enough to make him feel welcome. In a minute, he had swum over and was on the rocks beside them. Then, as he watched, the biggest of the boys dived into the water, and did not come up. Jerry gave a cry of alarm, but after a long time the boy came up on the other side of a big dark rock, letting out a shout of victory. Immediately the rest of them dived and Jerry was alone. He counted the seconds they were under water: one, two, three… fifty… one hundred. At one hundred and sixty, one, then another, of the boys came up on the far side of the rock and Jerry understood that they had swum through some gap or hole in it. He knew then that he wanted to be like them. He watched as they swam away and then swam to shore himself. Next day he swam back to the rocks. There was nobody else there. He looked at the great rock the boys had swum through. He could see no gap in it. He dived down to its base, again and again. It took a long time, but finally, while he was holding on to the base of the rock, he shot his feet out forward and they met no obstacle. He had found the hole. In the days that followed, Jerry hurried to the rocks every morning and exercised his lungs as if everything, the whole of his life, depended on it.

  • 日本語訳にしてくださいませんか。

    気軽に話せる友人からのメールからの返信です。 ちょっと戸惑っていますがちゃんと正確な意味を知りたいです。 No you didn't offend me at all. I just asked Dave out of the blue so he didn't know we had ever talked about it. I just wanted to find out for myself why he was always so abrupt with you. But he confirmed, though sometimes impatient, that he really likes you. です。 よろしくお願いいたします。

  • 日本語訳をお願いします 2

    お願いします!! 続き Carved stone seals were common in the ancient world.Merchants and government officials stamped them into soft clay instead of writing a signature.The seals were usually decorated with pictures of animals and sometimes a few signs or symbols.Cunningham's seal had an animal and some lines that could have been letters.Except that the creature on his seal was not the usual bull or tiger,but something that looked like a one-horned bull-a unicorn.And if the lines were the letters or symbols of a language,it was not a script anyone had ever seen before. Alexander Cunningham spent the rest of his life thinking that his dig at Harappa in the Punjab had been a failure.He never realized that the seal he had found was a key to an unknown civilization,a civilization that no one ever suspected had existed.Before the seal was found at Harappa,archaeologists had believed that the oldest cities in India and Pakistan dated from about 700 BCE.They were wrong.The crumbling bricks that the engineers had used to raise the railroad out of the mud were 5,000 years old.They were what was left of an ancient civilization as large and well organized as those of Egypt and Mesopotamia.Historians call it the Indus civilization. The Indus civilization peaked with 1,500 settlements and serveral large cities,some with populations of up to 80,000 people.Its artisans were among the most skilled in the world,and its people traded with Mesopotamia and Central Asia.But in some ways,it was an easy civilization to overlook.Its people didn't build great pyramids or fancy tombs,as the Egyptians did.They didn't fight great battles and leave a great written legacy,like the Mesopotamians.