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お願いします (5) The Roman historian Livy had also written down a different legend about two brothers who were sons of the king. Their names were Numitor and Amulius. When their father the king died, Amulius grabbed the throne and forced Numitor to leave the kingdom. But then Amulius worried that someone might try to overthrow him. What if Numitor's daughter, Rhea Silvia, had children who might try to take the throne? Amulius wasn't taking any chances. He forced Rhea Silvia to join the Vestal Virgins―a group of women who served in the temple of the goddess Vesta. The Romans believed that Vesta wanted the complete attention of her priestesses, so the Vestal Virgins were not allowed to marry or have children. (6) Poor Rhea had no choice but to obey her uncle. But things didn't go according to Amulius's plan. Somehow, despite her protected life among the Vestal Virgins, Rhea became pregnant and gave birth to twins―two strong, handsome boys. She named her sons Romulus and Remus. Amulius was outraged when he heard the news. He ordered his servants to take the twins from their mother's arms nd drown them in the river. Rhea herself was bound and thrown into prison. (7) The servant couldn't bring himself to kill the babies, so he put them into a basket and set it afloat on the river. He was sure that the babies would be carried away and drowned as the king had commanded. But the river was kind and gently landed the basket on solid ground. (8) Although the twins didn't drown, they were still in great danger. If they didn't starve, wild animals might eat them. Miraculously, according to Livy, “a she-wolf, coming down from the... hill to quench her thirst, turned her steps towards the cry of the infants, and nursed them so gently that the keeper of the royal flock found her licking them with her tongue.”

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(5)ローマの歴史家リヴィは、また、王の息子だった2人の兄弟について異なる伝説を書き記しました。彼らの名前はヌミトルとアムーリウスでした。彼らの父親の王が死んだとき、アムーリウスが、王位を奪って、ヌミトルに王国を去ることを余儀なくさせました。しかし、その後、アムーリウスは、誰かが彼を打倒しようとするかもしれないと心配しました。 ヌミトルの娘、レア・シルビアに、王位を継ごうとするかもしれない子供が出来たらどうなるでしょう? アムーリウスは、運任せにはしませんでした。彼は、レア・シルビアにヴェスタの乙女 ― 女神ヴェスタの神殿に仕える一団の女性たち ― に加わることを強いました。ローマ人は、ベスタが彼女の尼僧たちの申し分のない世話を要求すると信じていたので、ヴェスタの乙女は、結婚したり子供をもうけることが許されませんでした。 (6)可哀相なレアは、彼女の叔父に従わざるを得ませんでした。しかし、事態は、アムーリウスの計画通りにはいきませんでした。どういうわけか、ヴェスタの乙女たちの中での彼女の保護された生活にもかかわらず、レアは妊娠し、双子 ― 2人の丈夫で、ハンサムな男の子 ― を出産しました。彼女は、彼女の息子たちをロムルスとレムスと名付けました。アムーリウスは、この知らせを聞いたとき激怒しました。彼は、その双子を彼らの母親の腕から奪い去り、彼らを川で溺れさせるように彼の召使に命じました。レア自身も、縛りあげられ、投獄されました。 (7)その召使は、二人の赤ん坊を殺す気になれませんでした、それで、彼は、二人をかごに入れて、川に浮かべました。二人の赤ん坊は、流れに運び去られ、王が、命じた様におぼれ死ぬだろうとその召使は、確信しました。しかし、川は、親切で、優しく、その籠をしっかりとした大地に打ち上げました。 (8)双子は溺れませんでしたが、彼らは、依然として、大変危険な状況にありました。彼らが、飢え死にしないとしても、野生動物が、彼らを食べるかもしれません。奇跡的に、リヴィによると、「雌のオオカミが、のどの渇きをいやすために丘から降りて来て、彼女の歩みをその幼子たちの叫び声に向け、王家の番人が、オオカミが舌で幼子たちをなめていると気付くほど、彼らをとても優しく世話しました。」

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