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日本語訳お願いします。

Going to the shore on the first morning of the vacation, Jerry stopped and looked at a wild and rocky bay, and then over to the crowded beach he knew so well from other years. His mother looked back at him. “Are you tired of the usual beach, Jerry?” “Oh, no!” he said quickly, but then said, “I’d like to look at those rocks down there.” “Of course, if you like.” Jerry watched his mother go, then ran straight into the water and began swimming. He was a good swimmer. He swam out over the gleaming sand and then he was in the real sea. He saw some older, local boys — men, to him — sitting on the rocks. One smiled and waved. It was enough to make him feel welcome. In a minute, he had swum over and was on the rocks beside them. Then, as he watched, the biggest of the boys dived into the water, and did not come up. Jerry gave a cry of alarm, but after a long time the boy came up on the other side of a big dark rock, letting out a shout of victory. Immediately the rest of them dived and Jerry was alone. He counted the seconds they were under water: one, two, three… fifty… one hundred. At one hundred and sixty, one, then another, of the boys came up on the far side of the rock and Jerry understood that they had swum through some gap or hole in it. He knew then that he wanted to be like them. He watched as they swam away and then swam to shore himself. Next day he swam back to the rocks. There was nobody else there. He looked at the great rock the boys had swum through. He could see no gap in it. He dived down to its base, again and again. It took a long time, but finally, while he was holding on to the base of the rock, he shot his feet out forward and they met no obstacle. He had found the hole. In the days that followed, Jerry hurried to the rocks every morning and exercised his lungs as if everything, the whole of his life, depended on it.

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 休みの最初の朝、海岸に行って、ジェリーは立ち止まり入り江の原生岩を眺め、その後ここ何年も行き慣れた、多くの人が犇いている浜辺の方へ行った。  彼の母は振り返って「ジェリー、いつもの海岸は、もう飽きた?」と尋ねた。「いや」と彼は素早く答えたが「あそこの岩を見てみたいな」と言った。  「勿論(行って)いいわよ、そうなら」、ジェリーは母が去るのをみて、すぐ海に走り込み、泳ぎ始めた。彼は泳ぎがうまかった。  彼が、砂の輝く浅瀬を泳ぎ過ぎると、本当の海に出た。  彼にとっては大人同然の、彼より年上の数人の地元の少年が岩の上に座っているのを見た。一人は微笑んで手を振った。  ジェリーは、それが自分が快く受け入れられている印として十分だと感じた。間も無く彼は岩に泳ぎついて、その少年たちの隣に座った。  すると目の前で、一番年上の少年が海に飛び込んで上がってこない、ジェリーはびっくりして声を上げた。  長い間が過ぎて、その少年は大きな黒い岩の反対側に出てきて、「やった」と叫びを上げた。  あっという間に少年達は飛び込みジェリーは一人ぼっちになった。彼はみんなが飛び込んでから何秒たったか数えた1、2、3、、、50、、、100。  160で、一人、また一人と岩の反対側に浮き上がり、ジェリーは、彼らが岩の切れ目か穴かを泳ぎ抜けたのだと気付いた。  ジェリーは、自分も大人になりたいと思った。彼は少年達が泳ぎ去るのを見届け、自分も浜辺に泳いで帰った。  次の日、彼はその岩に行った。ほかには誰もいなかった。彼は少年達が泳ぎ抜けた大きな岩を眺めた。割れ目はなかった。岩の下を何度も何度も潜って見た。  長い間かかったが、とうとう岩の根元を手で触れながら足を前に出すと遮るものが何もない(ところがあった)。彼はその穴を見つけたのである。  その後の何日か、ジェリーは毎朝例の岩に急いで行き、あらゆるものが、彼のいのち全体が、かかっているかのように、肺の体操(=息を止める練習)をした。  (ちょっと年末の野暮用が重なって粗い訳ですが、まずいところは質問者さんが直してください)

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