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お願いします (6) The vizier was a man who wore many hats (or, in at least two cases, she was a woman who wore many hats). As "Overseer of Works," the vizier was in charge of all of the king's engineering projects. He saw to it that men and materials were on site to build monuments, tombs, and temples, to repair dikes, dig canals, and dredge waterways. As "Keeper of the Seal," the vizier was responsible for the records, for marriage contracts, wills, deeds to property, court transcripts, and keeping a head count of cattle and people. His duties were endless. One vizier didn't exaggerate when he wrote, "I spent many hours in the service of my lord." (7) The vizier served the king, the gods, and the people. An 18th-dynasty scribe writes that the vizier  Did what the king loves: he raised ma'at to its lord.... reporting daily on all his effective actions....  Did what the gods love: he enforced the laws and laid down rules, administered the temples, provided the offerings, allotted the food and offered the beloved ma'at....  Did what the nobility and people love: he protected both rich and poor, provided for the widow without a family and pleased the revered and the old. (8) All this work was too much for one person. Many officials reported to the vizier. And each of them had a title, usually with the name "overseer." There was the "Overseer of the Double House of Silver" (the treasurer), the "Overseer of the King's House" (the royal steward), and there was even the "Overseer of the Royal Toenail Clippings" (no explanation necessary). The officials who came in contact with the king personally could add yet another name to their title that meant, "Known to the King" (an addition the Toenail Clipping official most likely deserved).

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(6) 主席大臣は、多くの帽子をかぶった男性でした。(または、少なくとも2つの事例では、多くの帽子をかぶった女性でした) 「仕事の監督」として、主席大臣は王の土木計画の全てを担当していました。 彼は、記念碑、墓、神殿を建設し、堤防を補修し、運河を掘り、水路を浚渫する(さらう)ために人員と材料が現場にあるように取り計らいました。「証明の管理者」として、主席大臣は、諸記録、結婚契約、遺言、財産の証書、裁判記録、牛と人々の数を管理することに対して責任がありました。 彼の任務は、終りがありませんでした。 ある主席大臣が次の様に書いた時、誇張ではありませんでした、「私は、多くの時間を陛下への奉仕に費やしました。」 (7) 主席大臣は、王、神、人民に仕えました。 第18王朝の書記は、高官は、 王が愛することを行った: 彼は、支配者にマアト(平和)もたらした .... 毎日、彼のすべての効果的な行動を報告した .... 神が愛することを行った: 彼は法律を施行し、規則を制定し、神殿を管理し、供え物を行い、食物を割り当て、愛されるマアトを提供した .... 貴族と人民が愛することを行った: 彼は富める者と貧しい者両方を保護した、家族のない未亡人を扶養し、尊敬されるべき人々や老人を喜ばせた。 (8) これほどの仕事は、1人の人間には手に負えませんでした。 多くの役人が、主席大臣に報告しました。 そして、彼らのめいめいには、称号があり、たいてい「監督」と言う名前が付いていました。 「銀の2棟続きの家の監督」(会計係)、「国王の家の監督」(王室の執事)がありました、そして、「王の足の爪の監督」(説明不要)さえありました。個人的に王と接触のある役人は、彼らの称号にさらに別の名前を加えたかもしれません、その意味は、「国王に知られし者」(足の爪を切る役人に付けられる追加の名前に多い)でした。 ☆PCが修理から戻りました。体調が、まだ、万全ではないので、少しずつ元のペースに戻ればと思っています。

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