• ベストアンサー
  • すぐに回答を!

日本語訳を! 3-(7)

お願いします。  Today when archaeologists dig up the bodies of pyramid builders it is clear that many survived serious injuries thanks to Imhotep and his long list of cures. But many did not. And, during the Old Kingdom, life everlasting was not for the common man. He could only hope to play his part in the cycle of life and death by building a tribute to his king and in doing so add to the grandeur of Egypt.

共感・応援の気持ちを伝えよう!

  • 回答数1
  • 閲覧数52
  • ありがとう数1

質問者が選んだベストアンサー

  • ベストアンサー
  • 回答No.1
  • sayshe
  • ベストアンサー率77% (4555/5903)

 今日、考古学者が、ピラミッド建設労働者の遺体を掘り起こすと、多くの人が、イムホテプと彼の長いリストの治療法のおかげで、重症でも死ななくて済んだことが明らかです。 しかし、生き残れなかった人々も大勢いました。 そして、古王国の時代、永遠に続く命は、普通の人には用意されていませんでした。 彼は、王に対する記念物を建設し、そうすることによって生死の輪廻においてに自分の役割を果たし、そうする際に、エジプトの威厳を増大させることを望むことしかできませんでした。

共感・感謝の気持ちを伝えよう!

質問者からのお礼

ありがとうございます。

関連するQ&A

  • 日本語訳を!!

    お願いします (25) In spite of his poor health, Augustus lived to be 76 years old and reigned for 41 years as emperor. In the last years of his life, he realized that he must choose a successor. But whom? His beloved grandsons had both died young. With only one logical choice left, Augustus summoned his stepson Tiberius to Rome. He named this gloomy man as his co-ruler and successor. (26) In 14 CE, Augustus took a last journey by sea. He caught a chill in the night air and became quite ill. He called Tiberius to his bedside and spoke with him for a long time in private. Then, on August 19, knowing that the end was near, he called for a mirror and had his hair carefully combed. The biographer Suetonius tells the story: “he summoned a group of friends and asked ‘Have I played my part in the comedy of life believably enough?’” Then he added lines from a play: If I have pleased you, kindly show Appreciation with a warm goodbye. (27) Augustus Caesar had played many roles well: the dutiful heir of Julius Caesar; the victor over Antony; the reformer of Roman government; the generous sponsor of literature and art;and, in his final years, the kindly father figure of Rome─providing food, entertainment, and security to his people. Near the end of his life, he remembered: “When I was 60 years old, the senate, the equestrians, and the whole people of Rome gave me the title of Father of my Country and decreed that this should be inscribed in the porch of my house.” (28) When Augustus died, all Italy mourned, and the Senate proclaimed him a god. His rule marked a turning point in history. In his lifetime, the Roman Republic came to an end. but he rescued the Roman state by turning it into a system ruled by emperors─a form of government that survived for another 500 years. In an age in which many rules were called “saviors” and “gods,” Augustus Caesar truly deserved to be called the savior of the Roman people.

  • 日本語訳を! 8-(5)

    お願いします。 (14) Archaeologists who have been digging and surveying at the pyramid town of Kahun on and off since 1889 have discovered what urban life was like in the Middle Kingdom. The walled village built beside the pyramid complex was home to the king's workers and their families. Judging from the size of their grain silos, there was enough food to support as many as 5,000 people. Seeds found in the ancient layers show botanists what the vegetation looked like back then. Poppies, lupines, and jasmine bloomed and perfumed the air. Gardeners tended their peas, beans, radishes, and cucumbers. (15) Nearby, archaeologists piece together life in the royal court as the area is excavated. One papyrus, The Tale of Sinuhe, gives us an idea of how a Middle Kingdom palace functioned. It was divided into three main parts. The royal family and their servants lived in an area called the Nursery. Banquets were held in the Pillared Hall. And business was conducted in the Audience Hall. (16) The story of the royal guard Sinuhe reveals that even in the Middle Kingdom plots to murder the king and overthrow the throne were a constant worry. King Amenemhet had united the country, but not all those governors were willing to give up their power now that they had tasted it. Prince Senwosert was on his way home from battle when messengers brought news from the palace that his father had been murdered. The story goes that Sinuhe, overhearing their message, panicked and fled Egypt. Crossing the desert, he thought he had met his end: "Thirst's attack overtook me, and I was scorched, my throat parched. I said, This is the taste of death."

  • 日本語訳を!c14-2

    お願いします!  One of the main messages that drew people to the teachings of Mahavira was his idea that all things are connected:  All men who are ignorant of the Truth are subject to pain;in the endless cycle of rebirth they suffer in many ways.  Therefore a wise man,who considers well the ways that lead to bondage and birth,should himself search for the truth,and be kind towards all creatures.  Mahavira's five rules of telling the truth,never stealing,never owning anything,never hurting anything,and remaining celibate were very difficult to follow.But in time his teachings became popular anyway.Most everyone wanted to reach moksha,release from the cycle of rebirth.People believed hat Mahavira achieved moksha upon his death at the age of 72.Instead of being born again,his spirit was released from the cycle of life and death.Some said that Indra,king of the deities,collected the pieces of his bones that were left after his body was burned and took them to heaven,where the deities joined together to worship them.  Mahavira did not try o start a religion .He was one of many teachers who had conquered the senses-who had learned how not to pay attention to feelings such as hunger,thirrt,and pain-and helped others to understand the way to reach moksha.Mahavira and others who have conquered their five senses are called jina,or conquerors.The name of the religious tradition that grew up around these teachers is called Jainism.  In Jainism,men and women who are great teachers are called“ford makers.”A ford is a place where it is easy to cross a stream-a ford maker is someone who helps others find a way to cross from the river of life and endless death and rebirth,to the peace of enlightenment,when the soul unites with the universe.These teachers learned to control their senses and desires and to break free from life on Earth.Mahavira was the 24th ford maker.

  • 日本語訳を!!10

    お願いします (1) Everyone in first-century BCE Rome knew Marcus Tullius Cicero's name. He served as a consul―Rome's top office―and his fiery speeches drew crowds of listeners. When Cato the Younger, the great grandson of Cato the Censor, called Cicero“the father of his country,”everyone cheered. Yet Cicero's letters show that he sometimes couldn't decide what to do. And he worried a lot about his children. When his daughter Tullia died, he was heartbroken. He wrote to his best friend, Atticus, about his sadness: I have isolated myself, in this lonely region.... In the morning, I hide myself in the dense...forest and don't come out until night.... My only form of communication now is through books, but even my reading is interrupted by fits of crying. (2) Cicero wrote hundreds, maybe thousands, of letters. Amazingly, 900 of them have survived, more than 2,000 years later. They include letters to his friends and to other politicians, in addition to those that he wrote to his brother and his unruly, playboy son. In them, we learn about family problems, deaths, and divorces―not to mention his opinions on almost everything. (3) Like many grown-ups, Cicero liked to give advice, and his letters are generously sprinkled with hints, warnings, and words of wisdom. He was often pompous, even conceited, but he showed his feelings in his writing, even when his honesty made him seem weak or afraid. (4) Some of Cicero's letters report on the latest happenings in Rome. His words give us the best picture we have of life in the 1st century BCE. He wrote about simple things: the weather, gladiatorial games, and the price of bread. But he also described wars, riots, scandals, and the plots of scheming politicians.

  • 18-1日本語訳

    お願いします。  Prince Ashoka Maurya had two kinds of heroes.The first were the deities of the Vedic scriptures and the prince and princesses who served them in sacred texts such as the Mahabharata and the Ramayana.These religious heroes taught him the satisfaction of living with honor and justice(dharma),the excitement of money and succesr(artha),and the contentment of enjoying the world's beauties and pleasures(kama).They taught him that if he filled his life with these qualities of honor,excellence,and beauty,he would reach moksha,when the cycle of life,death,and rebirth would end.   That all sounded good to Prince Ashoka.But so did the adventures of his second kind of hero-the warrior heroes like his father,King Bindusara,and his grandfather,Chandragupta.Ashoka loved fighting,and he was good at it.He may well have gone to a military academy like the one in Taxila.Brahmins and Kshatriya came there from all over the subcontinent to learn military science,including the use of the eight major eapoms.Brahmins shot bows,the Kshatriya were swordsmen,the Vaishya used the lance,and the Shudra wielded the mace-a heavy,spiked,hammerlike weapon.The teacher was skilled in all those weapons plus the disk(chakra),the spear,and fighting with his bare hands.Brahmin and Kshatriya students were also trained to command a war elephant.  Military academies like the one in Taxila show how important war was to the people of Ashoka's time.Each town had its own central armory,a strong building for storing weapons,run by a superintendet.The government kept such tight control over its weapons that all soldiers had to return their arms to the armory after they practiced each morning.No one could carry a weapon unless he had special permit.

  • 日本語訳を! 8-(1)

    お願いします。 (1) The First Intermediate Period began with blood. With each passing year of Pepi II's reign, which began in 2278 BCE, the aging king's power slipped a little more. The governors of the outlying provinces who all had once lived in the capital city with Pepi II moved out o the rural lands they governed. Until then, whatever each province produced, such as grain, had gone to the capital to be handed out by the great and powerful King Pepi II. Now goods remained in the province to be distributed by the governor. Poweq shifted. It shifted, bit by bit, from the capital to the provinces―from the king to the governors. (2) The governors, accustomed to palace life, began to build their own luxurious houses. They financed their rich lifestyle by keeping more and more of the local goods. Soon they needed artists to decorate their homes and their tombs. Rural Egypt changed. Wealth and culture shifted, bit by bit, from the capital to the provinces―from the control of the king to the control of the governors. (3) A papyrus known as the Admonitions of Ipuwer tells how wealth moved from royalty to ragamuffin: "poor men have become owners of wealth, and he who could not make sandals for himself is now a possessor of riches...noblemen are in distress while the poor man is full of joy...the land turns around as does a potter's wheel." (4) One typical governor, Ankhtyfy, ruled two provinces. Inscribed on the pillars of his tomb are the details of his life. He begins his autobiography by bragging, "I was the beginning and the end of mankind, since nobody like myself existed before, nor will he exist...I surpassed the feats of the ancestors, and coming generations will not be able to equal me...." This man did not suffer from low self-esteem.

  • 日本語訳を! 8-(6)

    お願いします。 (17) But just when he was sure he was a goner, Sinuhe was rescued by a tribe of nomads. The head of the tribe tells Sinuhe, "stay with me; I shall do you good." True to his word, the headsman made Sinuhe a wealthy and important man. But when Sinuhe grew old he began to miss his beloved homeland. Sinuhe wanted to be buried in Egypt. He wanted to build his tomb―his resting place for eternity―in his own country. Sinuhe writes to Senwosert, now king of Egypt; "Whatever God fated this flight―be gracious, and buring e home! Surely You will let me see the place where my heart still stays! What matters more than my being buried in the land where I was born?" King Senwosert answers, "Return to Egypt! And you will see the Residence where you grew up." (18) Back in Egypt, the king gave Sinuhe a home and food and fine linen. All his needs were taken care of: "A pyramid of stone was built for me...the masons who construct the pyramid measured out its foundations; the draughtsman drew in it; the overseer of sculptors carved in it." Sinuhe's tale, like Egypt itself, was in for a happy ending. Using "landing" as a metaphor for death―an appropriate word choice for a tale of journey―Sinuhe ends his story by saying, "I was in the favors of the king's giving, until the day of landing came." And now Egypt was in the favors of the king, too. It had traveled from monarchy to anarchy and back again.

  • 日本語訳を! 5-(4)

    お願いします。 (11) Osiris and Isis were two of the original nine gods. They were the children of the goddess of the sky and the god of the earth. Osiris became king of Egypt. He married the great love of his life, his sister Isis. His brother, Seth, was jealous. Seth wanted everything that Osiris had. He wanted to be king. He wanted his power. He wanted Isis. Seth pushed sibling rivalry into the evil zone. He plotted to destroy Osiris. Plutarch writes, "Seth secretly measured the body of Osiris and had made to the corresponding size a beautiful chest which was exquisitely decorated. He brought the chest to a banquet, and when the guests showed pleasure and admiration at the sight of it, Seth promised playfully that whoever would lie down in it and show that he fitted it, should have the chest as a gift." Then, in true Cinderella-and-the-glass-slipper fashion, everyone tried the coffinlike chest on for size. Some were so fat they couldn't squeeze into the box. Others were so small they slid right out. But, finally, when Osiris tried the coffin, the fit was just right. Plutarch writes that Seth "ran and slammed the lid on, and after securing it with bolts from the outside and with molten lead poured on, they took it to the river and let it go to the sea... "Osiris drowned. Death came to Egypt for the first time. (12) Seth enjoyed everything that once belonged to Osiris. But whereas Osiris was kind, Seth was cruel. There was no ma'at in Egypt with Seth in charge. There was war and hunger and lawlessness. Only Isis was unafraid of Seth. She found Osiris's body and turned herself into a bird and sang to him. In a fury, Seth cut Osiris into pieces and scattered him all over Egypt. Isis and her sister searched "in a papyrus boat, sailing through the marshes" for all his parts. They collectedthe pieces of Osiris, and with the help of Anubis, god of the dead, they sewed him back together.

  • 日本語訳を! 7-(4)

    お願いします。 (12) You try to imagine what it had looked like that first season your grandfather worked here. Then it was nothing more than an empty plateau. You remember his stories of how they chose where to place he very first stones. The priests had tracked the movement of the stars in the Great Bear constellation across the night sky. Using the stars for bearings nd applying "the instrument of knowing," a simple handheld rod with a string that dropped straight to the ground, they had staked out the base. Then, in a symbolic ceremony, King Khufu himself had pointed out true north by lining up the headdress of a priestess with the star that was the hoof of the Great Bear. The calculations were so precise that thousands of years later modern scholars would discover the Great Pyramid as less than a tenth of a degree off true north. (13) The orientation was critical for the king's entrance to the afterlife. The pyramid represented his rampway to heaven. From the Pyramid Texts we learn that the pyramid was the "stairway in order to reach the heights...stairs to the sky, which are laid down for the king, that he may ascend thereon to the heavens." And your grandfather was there to see the first rock put in place.

  • 日本語訳してください

    この文章を日本語訳してください。おねがいします In the 1950s, she retired from movies, but become increasingly popular as a TV star. She remarried. She was still accused by many in China of having been a spy for the Japanese during World War2, so she did not visit China for more than two decades. She became host of her own show in 1969 and went on to report from Palestine and Vietnam, two very troubled areas of the world. In 1974, she was elected to the Japanese Diet, where she served for 18 years as Outaka Yoshiko. Yet another life was added to the many she had already had. Upon retiring from government service, she became a leader of the Woman’s Asian Fund. She has written a book about her life under these many names. At the age of 90, Outaka was still very active. Despite the many difficulties that she experienced in life and the many changes, she continued to re-work herself in each “new life.” In a world of growing uncertainty, she is a fine model for all of us of how to adapt to changing conditions. Growth and development are important, even as we get old.