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お願いします (4) The mere mention of a name can be significant. In Year 10, a scarab was distributed announcing the arrival of a foreign princess to join Amenhotep's harem. But even on this scarab commemorating another woman, Queen Tiy's name is the name most closely linked to the king. Putting their names together clearly announces to the world her position as first queen. The last scarab, put out in Year 11, confirms their close relationship. It describes how a devoted Amenhotep III orders a lake made for his queen, Tiy. The lake was more than a mile long and a quarter of a mile wide. Some scholars estimate it may have been dug in just 15 days. "His Majesty celebrated the feast of the opening of the lake" by sailing witg his queen on the royal barge named his favorite name―the Dazzing Sun Disk. (5) Amenhotep the Magnificent was a very lucky king. He came to the throne when Egypt's treasury bulged with surplus harvests, the spoils of war, and goods from grade missions. And although the king would take sole credit for the country's good fortune, the man responsible for keeping things running smoothly was the vizier. Next to the king, the vizier was the most powerful person in Egypt. He, too, had many names, or titles. He was known as "Second to the King" and "Heart of the Lord" and "Eyes and Ears of the Sovereign." It was his job to keep law and order. He was in charge of taxes, all the records, troop movement, and even keeping track of the level of the Nile. The governors of every district reported to the vizier and the vizier reported to the king.

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(4) 単に名前を出すだけでも、意義深い場合があります。 治世10年目、アメンホテプのハーレムに加わるために外国の王女が到着したことを発表するスカラベが、配布されました。 しかし、もう一人の女性を祝うこのスカラベでさえ、ティイ女王の名前は、最も密接に王に結びついた名前です。 彼らの名前をまとめて表記することは、明らかに、第一夫人としての彼女の地位を世界に発表しています。最後のスカラベは、治世11年目に出されましたが、彼らの緊密な関係を裏付けています。 愛情深いアメンホテプ3世が、彼の妃ティイのために湖を作るように命じた経緯が述べられています。 その湖は、長さ1マイル以上、幅4分の1マイルでした。 それがわずか15日で掘られたかもしれないと見積もる学者もいます。彼の大好きな名前 ― 「まばゆき日輪」という名の付けられた国王のはしけに乗って彼の妃とともに船旅をして、「陛下は、湖を開くことを祝う饗宴を執り行いました。」 (5) 「壮麗なるアメンホテプ」は、とても幸運な王でした。エジプトの金蔵が余った収穫、戦利品、貿易使節団がもたらした商品で一杯だったとき、彼は王に即位しました。 そして、国の幸運はひとえに王の力であるとされるでしょうが、物事を滑らかに運営し続けることに対して責任がある人は、首席大臣でした。王に次いで、首席大臣は、エジプトで最も権力のある人でした。 彼もまた、多くの名前すなわち称号を持っていました。 彼は、「国王に次ぐ者」、「支配者の心」、「支配者の目と耳」として知られていました。 法と秩序を維持することが、彼の仕事でした。彼は、税、すべての記録、軍の展開、ナイル川の水位の経過を記録することさえ担当していました。 あらゆる地方の知事が、首席大臣に報告し、首席大臣は、王に報告しました。 ☆ぼつぼつ限界です。一度寝ます。

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  • 日本語訳を!

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