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お願いします (1) Ising of war and of that man who first came in exile from the shores of Troy to the coast of Italy. He was battered on land and sea by divine violence,... He had to suffer much in war until he built a city.... From him came the Latin people,...and the high walls of Rome. (2) With his homeland in enemy hands and his city in flames, Prince Aeneas, son of the goddess Venus, led a small group of Trojans to sea. After many months of being tossed about by fierce winds and storms, the travelers finally anchored their ships near the mouth of the Tiber River in Italy. Yet no sooner had they landed than the men began to plan another voyage. (3) This appalled the Trojan women. As the Greek historian Dionysius records the story, a noblewoman named Roma secretly took the women aside and suggested that they take matters into their own hands. “Tired of wandering,”the others listened eagerly. “Roma stirred up the... Trojan women”and suggested a simple plan. They all agreed, and “together, they set fire to the ships.” (4) At first the men were furious, but pretty soon they realized that the women had done the right thing. They had landed in a perfect spot. With mild weather and beautiful countryside―a cluster of hills just 15 miles from the sea―why should they leave? The men were so pleased that they named the place after Roma, the rebellious wife.

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(1) 私は、戦争の、そして、初めてトロイの海岸からイタリアの海岸に亡命して来たその男について歌います。彼は、神の暴力によって陸地でも海でも虐げられました、... 街を造るまで、彼は戦争で多くの苦しみを受けねばなりませんでした.... 彼が、ラテン系の人々...そして、ローマの高い壁の元になりました。 (2) 敵の手に彼の祖国がわたり、彼の都が炎に包まれるなか、女神ビーナスの息子であるアイネアス王子は、トロイの人々の小集団を海に導きました。 何カ月も激しい風と嵐にもまれた後、その旅人たちは、イタリアのテベレ川の河口近くに、彼らの船をようやく停泊させました。しかし、その男たちは、上陸するとすぐに、もう一つの航海を計画し始めました。 (3) これは、トロイの女たちをぞっとさせました。ギリシアの歴史家ディオニュシオスがその物語を記録したところでは、ロマという名の貴族の夫人が、ひそかにその女たちをそばに呼んで、彼女たち自身で問題に対処することを提案しました。 「放浪には飽きました」他の女たちは、熱心に耳を傾けました。「ロマは、トロイの女たちを興奮させました」そして、簡単な計画を提案しました。彼女たちは、全員、同意し、「一緒に、彼女たちは、船に火をつけました。」 (4)最初、男たちは、激怒しましたが、間もなく、彼らは、女たちが正しいことをしたと気付きました。彼らは、申し分のない地点に上陸していたのでした。温和な気候と美しい田園地帯 ― 海からわずか15マイルほどにある一群の丘 ― どうして彼らは、その地を去るべきでしょうか?男たちは、大変満足して、逆らった妻ロマにちなんで、その地を命名しました。

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お久しぶりです。ありがとうございます。

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翻訳ソフト?・・・・・。で (1)戦争の最初のイタリアの海岸にトロイの海岸からの亡命に来たあの男のイジング。彼は、神の暴力によって陸と海の上でボロボロていた...彼は町を建てまで、戦争で苦しむ多くする必要がありました....彼からラテン人、...と、ローマの高い壁が来た。 (2)敵の手と炎の中で彼の街で彼の故郷では、王子アイネイアス、女神ヴィーナスの息子は、海にトロイの小さなグループを主導した。激しい風と嵐に翻弄されて数ヶ月後に、旅行者は最終的にイタリアのテベレ川の河口近くに船を停泊。まだ早く、彼らは男性が別の航海を計画し始めたより上陸していなかった。 (3)これはトロイの木馬の女性愕然。ギリシャの歴史家のディオニュシオス物語を記録したように、ローマという貴婦人が密かさておき、女性を取り、彼らが自分の手に掲げる事項を取ることを示唆した。 "放浪のはうんざり、"他の人が熱心に耳を傾けていました。 "ローマは巻き起こし...トロイの木馬女性たち」とは、シンプルな計画を示唆された。彼らはすべて同意し、"一緒に、彼らは船に火をつけた。" (4)では、最初の男性が激怒しましたが、もうすぐ彼らは、女性が正しいことを行っていたことに気づいた。彼らは完璧な場所に着陸した。温暖な気候と美しい田園 - 彼らはちょうど15マイル海理由から丘のクラスタを残すべきかと男性は、彼らがローマの後に行われ、反抗的な妻ということを喜んでいた。

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