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(9) When the herdsman found Romulus and Remus, he took them home. He and his wife raised the boys their own. The twins grew to be brave, manly, and noble. They roamed the countryside like ancient Robin Hoods, often saving innocent people from danger and persecution. (10) Romulus and Remus eventually discovered who they really were and decided to found a new city near the Tiber River, where they had been rescued as babies. But the brothers didn't get along very well, and they disagreed about where the city should be built. They tried to settle their argument through divination, using the path of birds in the sky to figure out the wishes of the gods. They decided to watch some vultures flying overhead. Romulus tried to trick Remus, pretending to have spotted more vultures than he actually saw, and then Remus made fun of Romulus. The brothers got into a fight, and Romulus killed Remus. (11) Romulus buried his brother and then, with his followers, built a new city on the Palatine Hill and circled it with strong, stone walls. As the city grew, it eventually enclosed seven hills and took the name of its founder, Romulus―or Rome. The Romans dated everything that happened after that “frod the founding of the city”in 753 BCE. For more than a thousand years, they used a calender that began in that year. (12) Some Romans claimed that Romulus and Remus were the sons of Mars, the god of war. Later Romans believed that this connection to Mars explained Romulus's cruel attack on the Sabines, a tribe that lived in small, unprotected villages near Rome. Romulus was convinced that Rome would become great through war, so he pretended to invite his Sabine neighbors to a festival. But then he led the Romans in a sudden attack. The soldiers seized 30 unmarried women and ran off―taking the Sabine women home as their wives.

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(9) 牧夫がロムルスとレムスを見つけたとき、彼は彼らを家に連れて帰りました。彼と彼の妻は、その男の子たちを彼ら自身の子供として育てました。その双子は、勇敢で、男らしく、立派になりました。彼らは、古代のロビン・フッドの様に田園地方を放浪し、しばしば罪のない人々を危険や迫害から救いました。 (10) 結局、ロムルスとレムスは、自分たちが本当は何者なのか知りました、そして、彼らが、赤ん坊の頃に救われた、テベレ川の近くに新しい都を築くことに決めました。 しかし、兄弟はあまりうまくやっていけませんでした、そして、彼らは都が築かれる場所について意見が一致しませんでした。彼らは、神の願いを理解するために、空を飛ぶ鳥の道筋を使って占いをして、議論を解決しようとしました。彼らは、頭上を飛ぶ何羽かのハゲワシを観察することに決めました。ロムルスは、実際に見えたより多くのハゲワシを見たふりをして、レムスをだまそうとしました、そして、レムスはロムルスを馬鹿にしました。 兄弟は喧嘩を始めました、そして、ロムルスはレムスを殺しました。 (11) ロムルスは彼の兄弟を葬って、そして、彼の従者と共に、パラタインの丘に新しい都を築き、頑丈な石の壁で、それを囲みました。都が発展するにつれて、結局、それは7つの丘を囲みました、そして、創設者の名前を取って、ロムルス ― または、ローマと名付けられました。ローマ人は、紀元前753年の「都の造営以来」その後に起こったすべてのことに日付を付けました。1000年以上の間、 彼らは、その年から始まったカレンダーを使いました。 (12) ローマ人の中には、ロムルスとレムスが、戦の神であるマルスの息子たちであると主張する者もいました。マルスとのこのつながりが、ローマの近くの小さな、無防備な村に住んでいた種族のサビヌ人に対するロムルスの容赦のない攻撃の説明となると、後のローマ人は信じました。ロムルスは、ローマが戦争を通して大きくなると確信していたので、彼は、隣国のサビヌ人を祭りに招待するふりをしました。 しかし、彼は、ローマ人を率いて、急襲しました。兵士は、30人の未婚の女性を捕えて、逃げ ― サビヌ人の女性を妻として国に連れて帰りました。

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翻訳ソフトを使ってみましたが?・・・・・。こんなん出ました!! (9)牧夫は、ロムルスとレムスを見つけたとき、彼は家それらを取った。彼と彼のの妻は少年たちに彼らの独自のを提起した。双子は、勇敢で男らしい、そして貴族に成長。彼らは頻繁に危険と迫害から無実の人々を救う、古代ロビンフードのような田園地帯を歩き回った。 (10)ロムルスとレムスは、最終的に彼らは本当にあったし、それらが乳児として救出さされていたテベレ川、の近くに新しい都市を発見したすることを決めた誰が発見した。しかし、兄弟は非常にうまくやっていなかった、そして、彼らは都市が構築されるべきかについて反対した。彼らは、神々の願いを把握するため、空に鳥のパスを使用して、占いを通じて引数を解決しようとしました。彼らはオーバーヘッド飛ん一部ハゲタカを見て決めました。ロムルスは、彼が実際に見たよりも多くのハゲタカを発見したように装って、トリックレムスを試み、その後レムスロムルスの楽しみを作った。兄弟は戦いに持って、ロムルスはレムスを殺した。 (11)ロムルスは、彼の弟を埋めしてから、、彼の従節と共に、パラティーノの丘上で新しい都市を建てと強い、石の壁でそれを丸で囲んだ。市は育ったように、それは最終的には七丘を同封およびその創設者、ロムルス-またはローマの名前を取った。ローマ人は753 BCE内のその「都市のfrod創設"の後に起こったことすべてに日付を記入し。千年以上のために、彼らはその年に始まったカレンダーを使用していました。 (12)いくつかのローマ人はロムルスとレムスは火星、戦争の神の子孫であったことを主張した。その後、ローマ人は火星へのこの接続はサビニでロムルスの残酷な攻撃が、ローマの近くの小さな、保護されていない村に住んでいた部族を説明していることと信じていた。ロムルスがローマが戦争を通じて偉大になることを確信したので、彼は祭りに彼のザビーネの隣人を招待するふりをしていた。しかし、その後、彼は突然の攻撃でローマを率いて。兵士は30未婚女性を押収し、その妻としてザビーネ女性ホームをオフ取っ走った

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