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題名の通りです。お願いします! In 2002, it was admitted at a conference that the temperature control system in Sputnik” had failed. Also, the spacecraft had been designed quickly and little care was given to protecting the life inside. In fact, it was said that the capsule was designed poorly to test haw long a living creature could put up with dangerous conditions. The little while dog was a victim of humankind’s selfish aims and behavior. Oleg Gazenkov, the scientist who chose and prepared Laika for the mission, had this to say: “The more time passes, the more I am sorry about it. We did not learn enough from the mission to justify murdering an animal.” The little victim not only has a plaque in her honor, but she has appeared on postage stamps in many countries in honor of her sacrifice. Chocolate and cigarette brands have been named for her. There is a memorial website for her as well. More than 50 years after her death, Laika is still one of the most famous dogs of all time.

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> In 2002, it was admitted at a conference that the temperature control system in Sputnik” had failed. Also, the spacecraft had been designed quickly and little care was given to protecting the life inside. In fact, it was said that the capsule was designed poorly to test how long a living creature could put up with dangerous conditions. The little while dog was a victim of humankind’s selfish aims and behavior. Oleg Gazenkov, the scientist who chose and prepared Laika for the mission, had this to say: “The more time passes, the more I am sorry about it. We did not learn enough from the mission to justify murdering an animal.” 2002年になって、スプートニクの温度管理システムが機能停止していたことがある会合で明らかにされた。また、その宇宙船は急造の設計のため、内部の生命体を守るということにはほとんど注意を払われていなかった。実際、そのカプセルは、生体が危険な状態にどれくらいの間耐えられるかをテストするために貧弱な作りになっていたといわれる。 その短い時間の間、その犬は、人間の利己的な目的と行為の犠牲になった。そのミッションを行うためにライカを選んだ科学者オレグ・ガゼンコフはこう言っている、「時間が経つにつれ、私はその犬に申し訳ないという気がしてきた。我々は動物の命を犠牲にするということを正当化して、あのミッションから学ぼうとはしなかった」 > The little victim not only has a plaque in her honor, but she has appeared on postage stamps in many countries in honor of her sacrifice. Chocolate and cigarette brands have been named for her. There is a memorial website for her as well. More than 50 years after her death, Laika is still one of the most famous dogs of all time. その小さな犠牲者は、記念の盾になったばかりでなく、その犠牲を顕彰して多くの国で切手に描かれてきた。彼女の名前はチョコレートや煙草のブランド名として使われた。彼女を記念するウエブサイトも存在する。その死から50年が経過して、ライカは史上最も有名な犬の1頭となっている。

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    In 2002,it was admitted at a conference that the temperature control system in Sputnik2 had failed.Also,the spacecraft had been designed poorly to test how long a living creature could put up with dangerous conditions. This little white dog was a victim of humankind's selfish aims and behavior.Oleg Gazenkov,the scientist who chose and prepared Laika for the mission,had this to say:"The more time passes,the more I am sorry about it.We did not learn enough from the mission to justify murdering an animal." The little victim not only has a plaque in her honor,but she has appeared on postage stamps in many countries in honor of her sacrifice.Chocolate and cigarette brands have been named for her.There is a memorial website for her as well.More than 50years after her death,Laika is still one of the most famous dogs of all time.

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