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The lieutenant commanding the machine-gun section of 2nd Dragoon Guards was awarded the Distinguished Service Order, with two of his men receiving the Distinguished Conduct Medal. L Battery was later awarded the honour title of "Néry"; it was the only unit to be awarded this as a battle honour, although it was applied for by both the 5th Dragoon Guards and the 11th Hussars. The other participating units received the honour Retreat from Mons. The 4th Cavalry Division, conversely, was almost completely routed. Its actual casualties are unknown, though were thought to be greater than the British losses, and eight of their twelve guns were captured by the counterattack of the Middlesex Regiment. The brigades were ordered to disperse – according to one officer, they "had to withdraw or be destroyed" when the strength of the British reinforcements became apparent, and scattered in various directions. The Germans either moved north into the Compiègne Forest or east towards Crépy-en-Valois, but hearing fighting at Crepy doubled back to the south-east. They halted in the forests around Rosières, south of Néry; however, they were forced to abandon their remaining four guns, and most of their food and ammunition in the process. That afternoon, the cavalry observed the British columns retreating south along the roads, but were unable to attack them because of their lack of supplies. They left Rosières in the evening of 1 September; a patrol of the 1st Rifle Brigade entered the village at 7pm and found it had just been abandoned by a cavalry unit, leaving in such haste that they had abandoned a machine-gun. The bulk of the units managed to rejoin the First Army by the morning of 3 September, but the division was left behind with a reserve corps on 4 September when the II Cavalry Corps began to advance again. The Occupation of Samoa – the takeover and subsequent administration of the Pacific colony of German Samoa – started in late August 1914 with landings by an expeditionary force from New Zealand called the "Samoa Expeditionary Force". The landings were unopposed and the New Zealanders took possession of Samoa for the New Zealand Government on behalf of King George V. The Samoa Expeditionary Force remained in the country until 1915 but its commander, Colonel Robert Logan, continued to administer Samoa on behalf of the New Zealand Government until 1919. The occupation of Samoa represented New Zealand's first military action in the First World War.

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>The lieutenant commanding the machine-gun section of 2nd Dragoon Guards was awarded the Distinguished Service Order, with two of his men receiving the Distinguished Conduct Medal. L Battery was later awarded the honour title of "Néry"; it was the only unit to be awarded this as a battle honour, although it was applied for by both the 5th Dragoon Guards and the 11th Hussars. The other participating units received the honour Retreat from Mons. ⇒第2竜騎兵護衛隊の機関銃小隊を指揮する中尉は殊勲章を、それとともに彼の配下の2人の兵士が功労章を授与された。L砲兵中隊は後に「ネリー」の名誉称号を授与された。それは第5竜騎兵護衛隊と第11軽騎兵隊の両方によっても申請されたが、(L砲兵中隊のみが)戦闘名誉として授与された唯一の部隊であった。他の参加部隊はモンスから退却勲章なるものを叙勲された。 >The 4th Cavalry Division, conversely, was almost completely routed. Its actual casualties are unknown, though were thought to be greater than the British losses, and eight of their twelve guns were captured by the counterattack of the Middlesex Regiment. The brigades were ordered to disperse – according to one officer, they "had to withdraw or be destroyed" when the strength of the British reinforcements became apparent, and scattered in various directions. ⇒第4騎兵師団は、逆に、ほぼ完全な敗北を喫した。その実際の死傷者は不明であるが、英国軍の損失より大きいと考えられ、彼らの12門の大砲のうちの8門がミドルセックス連隊の反撃で捕獲された。その数個旅団が、英国軍の増援隊の強さが明らかになったことで、さまざまな方向に散らばったとき ―ある将校によると、「退却か崩壊が必須となって」― 解散を命じられた。 >The Germans either moved north into the Compiègne Forest or east towards Crépy-en-Valois, but hearing fighting at Crepy doubled back to the south-east. They halted in the forests around Rosières, south of Néry; however, they were forced to abandon their remaining four guns, and most of their food and ammunition in the process. That afternoon, the cavalry observed the British columns retreating south along the roads, but were unable to attack them because of their lack of supplies. ⇒ドイツ軍は、北のコンピーニュ森や東のクレピィ-アン-ヴァロワに向かって移動したが、クレピィでは、戦って南東に転進し、後退したと聞く。彼らはネリーの南、ロジェール周辺の森で止まった。しかし、残りの(使える)4門の大砲と使用中の食料・弾薬のほとんどを放棄せざるを得なかった。その日の午後、騎兵隊は英国軍の縦隊が道路に沿って南へ後退するのを観察したが、補給物資がなかったために彼らを攻撃することはできなかった。 >They left Rosières in the evening of 1 September; a patrol of the 1st Rifle Brigade entered the village at 7pm and found it had just been abandoned by a cavalry unit, leaving in such haste that they had abandoned a machine-gun. The bulk of the units managed to rejoin the First Army by the morning of 3 September, but the division was left behind with a reserve corps on 4 September when the II Cavalry Corps began to advance again. ⇒彼らは9月1日の夜にロジェールを去った。午後7時に第1ライフル旅団の巡視隊が村に入ると、それは騎兵部隊によって放棄されたばかりであることがわかった。機関銃を残したまま立ち去るほどの急ぎ振りであった。部隊の大部分は9月3日の朝までに第1方面軍に再合流することができたが、第II騎兵軍団が再び前進し始めた9月4日に、師団が予備軍団と共に取り残された。 >The Occupation of Samoa – the takeover and subsequent administration of the Pacific colony of German Samoa – started in late August 1914 with landings by an expeditionary force from New Zealand called the "Samoa Expeditionary Force". The landings were unopposed and the New Zealanders took possession of Samoa for the New Zealand Government on behalf of King George V. The Samoa Expeditionary Force remained in the country until 1915 but its commander, Colonel Robert Logan, continued to administer Samoa on behalf of the New Zealand Government until 1919. The occupation of Samoa represented New Zealand's first military action in the First World War. ⇒「サモア占領」―ドイツ領サモアの太平洋植民地の買収とその後の管理― は、1914年8月下旬に「サモア遠征軍」と呼ばれるニュージーランドからの遠征隊による上陸で始まった。上陸は抵抗を受けずに行われ、ニュージーランド軍は国王ジョージV世の代理としてニュージーランド政府のためにサモアを所有した。サモア遠征隊は1915年まで国内に留まったが、その指揮官であるロバート・ローガン大佐は、1919年まのニュージーランド政府代理としてサモアを統治し続けた。サモアの占領は、第一次世界大戦におけるニュージーランドの最初の軍事行動を体現した。

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第2ドラグーンガードの機関銃セクションを指揮している中尉は、彼の2人の男性がDistinguished Conduct Medalを受けて、Distinguished Service Orderを授与されました。 L Batteryは後に「Néry」の名誉称号を授与されました。 これは第5ドラゴン警備隊と第11ハスサーの両方によって申請されたが、これを戦闘名誉として授与された唯一の部隊であった。 他の参加ユニットはモンスから名誉退却を受けた。 第4騎兵師団は、逆に、ほぼ完全にルーティングされました。 その実際の死傷者は不明ですが、イギリスの損失より大きいと考えられていました、そして、彼らの12の銃のうちの8つはミドルセックス連隊の反撃で捕獲されました。 ある将校によると、イギリス軍の増援の強さが明らかになり、さまざまな方向に散らばったとき、旅団は解散を命じられました。 ドイツ人は北をCompiègneForestに、または東をCrépy-en-Valoisに向かって動かしましたが、Crepyでの公聴会は南東に倍増しました。 彼らはNéryの南、Rosières周辺の森で止まった。 しかし、彼らは残りの4個の銃、そしてその過程で彼らの食料と弾薬のほとんどを放棄することを余儀なくされました。 その午後、騎兵隊はイギリスのコラムが道路に沿って南に後退しているのを観察したが、補給がなかったためにそれらを攻撃することができなかった。 彼らは9月1日の夜にロシエールを去った。 第1ライフル旅団のパトロールは午後7時に村に入った、そしてそれがちょうど彼らが機関銃を放棄したことをそのような急襲で残して、騎兵隊ユニットによって放棄されたことがわかった。 部隊の大部分は9月3日の朝までに第一軍に再突入することができたが、第2騎兵団が再び前進し始めた9月4日に師団は予備軍団と共に取り残された。 サモア占領 - ドイツ領サモアの太平洋植民地の買収とその後の管理 - は、1914年8月下旬に「サモア遠征軍」と呼ばれるニュージーランドからの遠征隊による上陸で始まりました。 サモア遠征隊は1915年まで国内に留まりましたが、その指揮官であるロバート・ローガン大佐は、サモアのためにサモアを統治し続けました。 1919年までのニュージーランド政府。サモアの占領は第一次世界大戦におけるニュージーランドの最初の軍事行動を表していました。

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