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日本語訳をお願いします 6

お願いします!!続き People put their garbage in large clay pots stuck into the floor in rooms along the edge of the street.Some of these large jars set into the ground may have served as toilets that laborers cleaned out every so often.Most houses also had bathing areas and drains that emptied into pots or larger drains in the street. The system worked really well,as long as the merchants kept coming and paying the taxes that built the walls and drains and paid the laborers who maintained them.But by about 1900 BCE,after 700 comfortable years, things began to change.For reasons scholars still don't fully understand,fewer traders were willing to risk the dangers of traveling through desert and forest.We know there were fewer traders because archaeologists have found fewer valuable items from distant places.Because fewer traders were paying taxes,the cities could no longer afford to keep up their walls and inspectors.Changes in the course of the Indus River and its tributaries,combined with increased flooding may well have added to Harappa's problems.There may have been other reasons as well.Reasons that can only be found with further excavations.And someday,perhaps we will be able to read the Indus script.

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人々は、彼らのゴミを通りの端に沿った部屋の床に埋められた大きな陶器の壺に入れました。地面に埋め込まれたこれらの大きな壺のいくつかは、労働者が時々清掃するトイレとして用いられたかもしれません。ほとんどの家には、また、通りの壺やより大きな排水管に(汚水を)空ける入浴場所と排水管もありました。 このシステムは、商人が訪れ、壁と排水管を造る税金を払い続け、それらを支える労働者に支払いを続ける限り、本当に良く機能しました。しかし、快適な700年後の、紀元前1900年頃までには、事態は変わり始めました。学者にはまだ完全にはわからない理由のために、砂漠と森を旅して通過する危険を冒す覚悟のある交易商人が減ったのです。我々は、交易商人が減ったことが分かります、と言うのは、考古学者が遠隔地由来の貴重な商品をあまり見つけられなくなったからです。税金を払う交易商人の数が減ったので、都市には、もはやその壁や徴税官を維持するゆとりがなくなりました。 インダス川とその支流の川筋の変化が、増加した洪水と組み合わさって、ハラッパの抱える問題を増したことでしょう。他の理由も、同様にあったかもしれません。理由が、更なる発掘で見つかるのを待つのみです。そして、いつか、もしかすると、我々はインダス文字を読むことができるようになるかも知れません。

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