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日本語訳を!c9-3

お願いします!続き The crew filled some of the big storage jars with fresh water for the long trip,and packed the others with dried cheese,butter,honey,and beer.They stowed large sacks of wheat and barley toward the front end of the boat,where the sacks were less likely to get wet.Next to the grain,they stacked bales of cotton cloth,bleached white or dyed red or blue.The captain would have bought the cloth from traders who had floated down the shallow rivers that led to the center of the bountry on their flat-bottomed boats. As you might have guessed from Puabi's tomb,the boat's most valuable cargo was long carnelian beads.These beads were in great demand in Mesopotamia,and the captain wrapped them in soft cotton and packed them carefully in a basket so that they would not get broken during the trip. After he tied some branches from the sacred pipal tree to the mast to ward off evil spirits,the captain would have loaded his passengers:monkeys,peacocks,and sleek reddish brown gunting dogs to sell as pets,as well as a couple of traders who wanted passage to Mesopotamia. From Dholavira the captain sailed west across the delta,or the mouth,of the Indus River.With the delta behind him,he faced one of the most dangerous parts of his trip.The coast became very rocky and the crew had to watch for submerged islands as they sailed slowly through waters filled with fish and black-and-gold sea snakes.Once he had made it through that dangerous stretch,the captain could have sailed across the Arabian Sea for a quick stop along the coast of Oman,or chosen to sail directly to Mesopotamia,north through the Persian Gulf.Oman would have been a tempting side trip.The people there were willing to trade their copper,seashells,and pearls,all of which were in high demand in Mesopotamia,for the captain's wood and cotton cloth-but the first traders to arrive in Mesopotamia could charge the highest prices for their goods.

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船員は長旅のために大きい貯蔵用の壺のいくつかを淡水で満たして、他の壺には乾燥チーズ、バター、蜂蜜、ビールを詰め込みました。彼らは船の船首に向かって小麦や大麦の大きな袋を積み込みました、そこなら、袋は濡れる可能性が少なかったのです。穀物の隣には、彼らは白く漂白されたり赤や青に染められた綿の布の梱を積み重ねました。船長は、平底船に乗ってその国の中心部に至る浅い川を下って来た交易商人から布を買ったことでしょう。 プアビの墓から推測できるように、船の最も価値のある貨物は長い紅玉髄のビーズでした。これらのビーズはメソポタミアで多くの需要がありました、それで、それらが旅行の間に破損しない様に、船長は柔らかい綿でそれらを包んで、慎重にそれらを籠に詰めました。魔よけに神聖なインドボダイジュの木の枝をマストへ結びつけた後、船長は彼の乗客を乗せたことでしょう:ペットとして売るための猿、クジャク、つやのある赤褐色の猟犬、さらに、メソポタミアへの航海を望む2,3名の交易商人でした。 ドーラビラから、船長はデルタ地帯、すなわち、インダス河の河口を横切るように西へと航海しました。デルタ地帯を後にして、彼は旅の最も危険な部分の1つに向かいました。海岸は非常に岩が多くなりました、それで、魚や黒と金色のまだらのウミヘビで一杯の海をゆっくりと航海しながら、船員たちは水中に隠れた島(岩礁)に気をつけなければなりませんでした。一旦その危険な海域を上手く通過すれば、船長はオマーンの海岸沿いで短い停泊を求めてアラビア海を横切るか、ペルシャ湾を通って北に向かい、直接メソポタミアへ航海するルートを選ぶことができたでしょう。オマーンは、魅力的な立ち寄り先でした。そこの人々は船長の木材や木綿の布とその全てがメソポタミアで高い需要がある彼らの銅、貝殻、真珠を喜んで交換ました ― しかし、メソポタミアに最初に到着する交易商が彼らの商品に最も高い価格を付けることができたのです。

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