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日本語訳を!!c7-3

お願いします!!続き Say you were a merchant from Oman,in what is now known as the Middle East,come to Harappa to trade alabaster vases and fine woolen cloth for shell bangles and stone beads.The first thing you would have noticed was what wasn't there-no great temples or monuments,like the ones you had seen in the cities of Mesopotamia and Persia.You probably would have thought Harappa a poor place,without the grandeur of home.But hen you would have noticed the tidy,neat streets.Even as a stranger in a strange city,you didn't have to leave extra time in case you got lost in the maze of streets every time you went to the market.The streets were straight and predictable,and quieter than you were used to.Houses weren't open to the stredt,so you didn't hear every word that people were saying inside as you walked by.Instead,the main doorway of eabh house was located along a side street and had an entryway that screened the inside from curious eyes.The windows opened onto the courtyard at its center. You'd have noticed that the city smelled better than most cities you visited.Major streets had built-in garbage bins.Each block of houses had a private well and bathrooms with drains.The small drains leading from the bathing areas and toilets emptied hnto slightly larger drains in the side streets that flowed into huge covered sewer in the main streets,big enough for people to climb inside and clean.These big city sewers emptied outside of the city wall into gullies and were washed out every year by the rains.

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あなたが、現在中東として知られている地域のオマーンからアラバスター(雪花石膏)の花瓶や上等の羊毛の布と貝殻のバングルや石のビーズを交易するためにハラッパにやって来た商人だったとしましょう。あなたが気がつきそうな最初のものは、そこにないものでした ― あなたがメソポタミアやペルシャの都市で見かけたような大きな寺院や記念碑がないのでした。家の壮麗さがなければ、あなたはおそらくハラッパを貧しい場所と考えたでしょう。しかし、それから、あなたはきちんと整った街路に気がついたでしょう。見知らぬ都市の他所者としてさえ、あなたが市場に行くたびに、通りの迷路で道に迷った場合に備えて、あなたは余分な時間を取っておく必要はありませんでした。街路はまっすぐで予想がつきました、そして、あなたが慣れている街路より、静かでした。家は街路に向かって開いていなかったので、あなたが通りかかった時、人々が話しているすべての言葉が聞こえるというわけではありませんでした。その代わりに、各々の家の主要な戸口は、わき道に沿って位置していて、好奇に満ちた目から内部を保護する通路がありました。窓は、その中心にある中庭に向かって開いていました。 その都市があなたが訪問したほとんどの都市よりよいにおいがすると、あなたは気がついたことでしょう。主要な街路には、備え付けのゴミ箱がありました。家々のそれぞれの区画には、個人用の井戸と排水設備のある浴室がありました。お風呂場やトイレから通じている小さな排水管は、わき道のわずかにより大きな排水管に向かって空になり、それは、さらに、人々が内部で登って清掃するのに十分大きい大通りの巨大なふたをされた下水道に流れ込んでいました。これらの都市下水道は都市壁の外側の溝に向かって空になり、雨によって毎年洗い流されました。

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