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日本語訳を!!c7-2

お願いします!!続き Althongh they were made by hand and not machine,the fired bricks used used for building in the cities came in just one size and shape:a rectangle about 11 inches long and 5 1/2 inches wide(28 cm by 14 cm).These fired bricks were so strong that some of them have been recycled and are being reused in modern buildings.Bricks weren't the only things that were the same size-walls and doorways throughout the Indus Valkey are about the same size and design.Even wells were lined with the same styles of wedge-shaped bricks.And every city had a drainage system for carrying away rainwater and sewage from toilets and bathing areas. Who decided to make one-size-fits-all bricks?Who said that street had to run north/south and east/west?Today' cities are full of differences-the size,style,orientation,and building materials of any ten buildings are almost never the same.So why were the ancient Indus cities so similar? Maybe because one person-or one small group of people-was making all the decisions.Maybe a strong gouernment or strong religious leaders told everyone what to do.But there is no sign of large palaces or temples-the buildings of powerful governments and religious leaders.Perhaps the people of the Indus Vally had religious or historical beliefs that taught them that they should build everything in the same way.No one knows for sure. The cities of the Indus Valley were very well organized.They were divided into walled neighborhoods,with each neighborhood specializing in one kind of work.Potters lived in one area,and coppersmiths lived in another.People probably lived with their extended families-children,parents,cousins,aunts and uncles,and grandparents-all doing the same kind of work.

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それらは機械ではなく手で作られましたが、都市で建築に使われた焼きレンガは、全く大きさ形が一様です: 長さ約11インチ、幅5 1/2インチ(28cm×14cm)の長方形なのです。これらの焼きレンガはとても強かったので、それらの一部は、リサイクルされて、現代の建物でも再利用されています。大きさが同じであったのは、レンガだけではありません ― インダス渓谷一帯の壁や戸口は、ほぼ、同じ大きさとデザインです。井戸さえ、くさび形のレンガの同じスタイルで並んでいました。そして、あらゆる都市には、雨水やトイレや浴室から出る汚水を運び去る排水システムがありました。 誰が、全てに対応する同一サイズのレンガを作ることに決めたのでしょうか?誰が、街路が北/南と東/西に走らければならないと言ったのでしょうか?今日、都市は違いでいっぱいです ― 10の建物のどれをとっても、大きさ、様式、方向、建材は、ほとんど全く同じではありません。それでは、なぜ、古代のインダスの都市は、それほど類似していたのでしょうか? 多分、1人の人 ― あるいは1つの小集団の人々 ― がすべての決定をしていたからかもしれません。 多分、強い政府、もしくは、強い宗教指導者が、何をするべきかについて、みんなに命令したのでしょう。しかし、大きな宮殿や寺院 ― 強力な政府や宗教指導者の建物 ― を示す物が、ありません。おそらく、インダス渓谷の人々には、彼らが同様にすべてを造らなければならないと彼らに教えた、宗教的もしくは歴史的信条があったのでしょう。誰にも、はっきりとは分かりません。 インダス渓谷の都市は、非常によく整っていました。それら(都市)は、壁に囲まれた地区に分割され、各々の地区が1種類の仕事を専門としていました。陶工は1つの地区に住んでいて、銅器製造職人は別の地区に住んでいました。人々は彼らの大家族 ― 子供たち、両親、いとこ、叔母とおじ、そして、祖父母 ― と一緒に多分暮らしていたでしょう。そして、彼ら全員が、同じ種類の仕事をしていました。

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