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日本語訳を!!c6-3

お願いします!!続き Archaeologists know that the Indus script probably used both symbol-pictures and letters standing for different sounds.They have made out between 400 and 450 symbols,which are too few for a language without an alphabet and too many for a language with an alphabet.The script of the Mesopotamians,for example,used more than 600 symbols,each of which stood for a syllable and sometimes also for a whole word.The Canaanites,who lived to the west of Mesopotamia,later developedan alphabet of fewer than 50 symbols,each standing for a specific consonant. A lot of the examples we have of Indus script come from inscriptions on seals.The square seals of the Indus cities were made from a soft stone called steatite,or soapstone.The original color of the stone ranges from gray or tan to white.If the steatite was going to be used for a seal,the seal maker bleached it with a chemical solution and fired it in a kiln to make it hard and white.(For 100 years,archaeologists have been trying to figure out what that solution was,but no luck yet.) Some sealr were made from faience paste that could be molded,fired,and glazed.Faience is made from ground quartz that is melted and then reground to make a glassy paste.It can be colored with copper to make a blue-green or turquoise color,and then fired at high temperatures to make a shiny glazed object.

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    考古学者はインダス文字は、象徴画と、異なる音を表す文字の両方を使ったものと知っている。彼らは400から450のシンボルを解読しているが、これはアルファベットを持たない言語には少なすぎるし、アルファベットを有する言語にしては多すぎる。たとえば、メソポタミア人は音節、時には単語全体を表すシンボルを使い、その数は600以上だった。メソポタミアの西に住んでいたカナン人は、各シンボルが特定の子音を表す50個以下のアルファベットを案出した。          現存のインダス文字の多くは印章の文字に遡る。インダス地域の都市の印章は、凍石、あるいは石けん石と呼ばれる柔らかい石に彫られている。原石の色は灰色から淡黄色、白色の範囲にわたっているが。凍石が印章に使われる際には、印章彫りの職人がある薬品の溶液に晒し、竃で焼いて白色の硬度の高いものにした。(ここ百年の間、考古学者はこの薬品が何であるか特定しようとつとめてきたが未だ解明されてはいない)印章の中には、陶土をこねて型に入れ、釉薬をかけて作られたものもある。彩釉陶器は、石英の粉を溶解し、これを再び粉末状にしたガラスを練って作られた。これに青緑色あるいは空色を出すため銅で着色し、高い熱で焼いて彩釉陶器を作った。 (最初の部分は、インダス文字は、意味を表す象形文字と、音を表す表音文字との混成である、ということです。次は、純粋の表意文字なら漢字のように数が多く、音素を表す文字なら50も要らない、ということです。)

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  • 日本語訳を!!c6-2

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  • 日本語訳を!!c7-2

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