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日本語訳を!c9-4

お願いします!続き After about a month of travel,the ship from Dholavira arrived at the delta of the Tigris and the Euphrates Rivers.Here they paused until the captain could hire a local fisherman to help guide the ship through the treacherous channels of the delta before it arrived at last in the great city of Ur. Many people of the Indus Valley had made the trip before,and some of them had probably settled there to live.The captain most likely would have contacted a merchant originally from the Indus Valley to help convert Mesopotamian weights and measures and interpret for his Akkadian-speaking customers. The people of southern Mesopotamia may have paid for some of their goods with fine embroidered woolen shawls and blankets.They might also have traded in silver from Anatolia,which was widely used in Mesopotamia,and perhaps even in the more valuable gold bangles from Egypt.These simple,round bracelets were a convenient way to measure and carry gold,and could be melted down and made into other objects. On the slower return journey,the captain stopped at Dilmun,the island that today is called Bahrain,and traded Mesopotamian silver and textiles for pearls from the Persian Gulf.He also stopped at Magan,in what is now Oman,for copper and large,heavy seashells. Finally,around the beginning of June,the captain would have seen the long red flag at the top of his mast begin to flap in the southwesterly winds.That meant it was time to set sail and catch the winds before the monsoon became too strong.After filling the water pots,he and his crew headed east to the mouth of the Indus and the Gulf of Kutch.The whole trip took almost five months,but he was coming home with a ship full of valuable things that he could sell for a good profit in Dholavira and up the Indus River at Mohenjo Daro.

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およそ1ヵ月の旅の後、ドーラビラからの船は、チグリス川とユーフラテス川のデルタに到着しました。ここで、彼らは、船長がデルタの危ない水路を通過する船を誘導するのを手伝う地元の漁師を雇うことができるまで休憩しました、その後、船は、ようやく、ウルの巨大都市に到着する事が出来たのです。 インダス渓谷の多くの人々はそれ以前にも旅をしていました、それで、彼らの中にはおそらくそこに定住していた者もいたことでしょう。船長は、たぶん、メソポタミアの度量衡に換算して、彼のアッカド語を話す客のために通訳を手伝ってくれるインダス渓谷出身の商人と連絡を取っていたことでしょう。 南メソポタミアの人々は、すばらしい刺繍を施されたウールのショールや毛布で彼らの商品のいくつかの代金を支払ったかもしれません。彼らは、また、メソポタミアで広く使われてたアナトリア原産の銀で、そして、おそらくエジプト製のより価値ある金のバングルでさえ、取引したことでしょう。これらの簡素な、丸いブレスレットは、金を測って運ぶ便利な方法でしたし、溶かして、他の物に作り変えることもできました。 もっとのんびりした帰路の船旅では、船長は、今日バーレーンと呼ばれている島のディラムに寄港して、メソポタミアの銀や織物とペルシャ湾産の真珠を交換しました。彼は、また、銅や大きな、重い貝殻を求めて、現在オマーンである所のマガンにも立ち寄りました。 ようやく、6月初旬、船長はマストのてっぺんの長い赤旗が南西風の中ではためき始めるのを目にしたことでしょう。それは、モンスーンが強くなり過ぎる前に、出帆して、風を捕える時期が来たことを意味しました。水がめを満たした後、彼と彼の船員たちは、東方のインダス川河口とカッチ湾に向かいました。全部の旅にほぼ5ヵ月かかりましたが、彼は、ドーラビラで大もうけをした貴重品を満載した船と共に帰路につきインダス川をさかのぼりモヘンジョ・ダロに到着したのでした。

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  • 日本語訳を!c9-6

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