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日本語訳を!c9-6

お願いします!続き The river passage ended at the dangerous deep,narrow passages of the Kabul River,where the merchants left their boats and loaded their goods onto small,hardy mountain cattle and human porters.The trip across the plain near modern Kabul was easier,but once they got to the narrow valleys and high mountain passes of northern Afghanistan,they had to go by foot,leading the pack animals. They arrived at a small settlement of Indus people in the high valleys of Badakshan sometime in November.These Indus colonists mined lapis lazuli and panned for gold and tin in the river's sands,but they also kept herds of sheep,goat,and cattle,and farmed enough land to provide them with food for most of the year.But they liked being able to buy things from home,and they also wanted grain to trade with nomadic mountain people who brought them more precious stones and metals. Although they didn't have to find their way through schools of sea snakes and storms at sea,the merchants who traded in the high mountains faced other dangers.Early snows sometimes blocked the high mountain passes,and the monsoon and earthquakes washed the roads away all the time,forcing the merchants to blaze their own paths.So as soon as their trading was done,the merchants of“Meluhha”turned around and headed back down the mountains,eager to get home to snug houses and good friends before the cold days of winter set in.

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  • sayshe
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川の旅はカブール川の危険な深い、狭い水路で終わりました、ここで、商人は彼らの船を下りて、小さいが、丈夫な山牛と人間の運搬人に彼らの商品を積みました。現代のカブールに近い平野を横切る旅はより簡単でした、しかし、ひとたび、北アフガニスタンの狭い谷と高山の山道に着くと、彼らは、駄獣(荷物の運搬に用いられる動物)を引きながら、徒歩で行かなければなりませんでした。 彼らは、11月頃、バダクシュタンの標高の高い谷にあるインダスの人々の小さな集落に到着しました。これらのインダスからの入植者はラピスラズリを採掘して、川の砂の中にある金とスズを求めて選鉱鍋で砂を洗いました、しかし、彼らは、また、羊、ヤギ、牛の群も飼っていましたし、ほぼ1年分の食物を自分たちに供給するのに十分な土地を耕作してもいました。しかし、彼らは故郷のものを買うことができるのを好みました、それに、彼らは、また、彼らにより多くの宝石や金属を持って来る遊牧民の山岳民族と取引するために穀物を欲しがりました。 海路でウミヘビの群れや嵐を越えて旅をする必要はありませんでしたが、高山で交易をする商人は他の危険に直面しました。早めの雪が高い山道をふさぐこともありましたし、モンスーンの雨や地震が常に道を洗い流しました、それで、商人は彼ら自身の行く手を切り開かざるをえませんでした。そう言うわけで、彼らの交易が済むとすぐに、「メルーハ」の商人は向きを変えて、山を下って帰りました、冬の寒い日々が始まる前に、心地よい家や親友の元にたどり着きたいと思っていたのでした。

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  • wy1
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日本語訳を!c9-6 ってどのような意味でしょうか?翻訳依頼でしたら、専門の翻訳会社にでも依頼すべき長さでしょうね。 あるいは、ご自分の訳文を載せて、分からない箇所を質問すべきでしょうね。

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