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日本語訳を!c11-1

お願いします!  Imagine you could watch the history of the world as a super-fast movie shot from outer space.If you were watching the South Asian subcontinent,things would look about the same from about 3000 to 2000 BCE with cities,villages,and crops sprinkled throughout the Indus Valley.But about 2000 BCE,the scene would start to change dramatically.Some of the old settlements along what used to be the Saraswati River would disappear as the once-great river dried up.Then you would see spaces opening up in the jungles along the Yamuna and Ganga River valley as new communities moved in.These communities cut down and burned trees to make room for towns,cities,and fields of summer crops watered by the monsoon,such as rice and millet.  We know a lot more about these new communities than we do about the Harappans because we have their scriptures,called the Vedas.The Vedas are a collection of hymns,narratives,and religious instructions in the Sanskrit language.Sanskrit was not written down at first ,and the Vedas were only passed on through memorizatiom.How much can you memorize? Could you memorize a poem? A story? How about a whole book? How about memorizing a whole book by repeating back what your teacher tells you,without having words to look at? How about a whole lot of books? The Vedas were so important that students spent 10,15, or even 20 years studying and memorizing them so that they would not be lost from generation to generation.Young boys who belonged to a class of people called Brahmin had to learn the alphabet of the sacred language of Sanskrit before they could begin to learn the hundreds of sacred texts in the Vedas.

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  • 回答No.1
  • sayshe
  • ベストアンサー率77% (4555/5904)

宇宙から超高速映画の場面として、あなたが世界の歴史を見ることができたと想像してください。あなたが南アジアの亜大陸を見ているならば、インダス渓谷一帯に散在する都市、村、作物に関しては、状況は紀元前3000年頃から紀元前2000年頃までほぼ同じに見えるでしょう。しかし、紀元前2000年頃に、場面は劇的に変わり始めます。かつての大河(サラスワティー川)が干上がるにつれて、以前サラスワティー川であった流域に沿った古い集落のいくつかが消えます。それから、新しい地域社会が進出するに伴って、あなたはヤムナ川とガンガ川の渓谷に沿ったジャングルで空き地が開かれるのを目にするでしょう。これらの地域社会は、町、都市、米や雑穀の様なモンスーンによって水を供給される夏の作物の畑のための空間を作り出すために木々を切り倒したり焼き払ったりしました。 これらの新しいコミュニティについては、ハラッパの人々についてよりも我々はよく分かります、と言うのは、ベーダと呼ばれる彼らの聖典が我々にはあるからです。ベーダは、サンスクリット語で書かれた賛美歌、物語、宗教的な教えを集めたものです。サンスクリット語は最初は書きとめらず、ベーダは暗記によって引き継がれました。あなたは、どれほど暗記することができますか?1編の詩を暗記できますか?1つの物語はどうでしょう?本丸ごと1冊はどうでしょう?目をやる文字がなく、師があなたに語ることを繰り返すことで1冊の本を丸ごと暗記するのはどうでしょう?何冊もの本の丸暗記はどうでしょう?ベーダはとても大切だったので、世代から世代を経るにつれてそれらが失われない様に、学生は10年、15年、20年を費やしてそれらを研究し、暗記したのです。

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  • 回答No.2
  • sayshe
  • ベストアンサー率77% (4555/5904)

#1.です。和訳の最後の部分が抜けました。以下を追加して下さい。 バラモンと呼ばれる階級の人々に属した幼い少年たちは、彼らがベーダの何百もの神聖な本文を学び始めることができる前に、サンスクリット語の神聖な言語の文字を学ばなければなりませんでした。

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