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Surprised, outnumbered and outgunned, three German light cruisers and one destroyer were sunk, three light cruisers were damaged, 712 sailors killed, 530 injured and 336 taken prisoner. The British only suffered casualties of 35 killed and 40 wounded, one light cruiser and three destroyers damaged. Despite the inequality of the fight, the battle was regarded as a great victory in Britain, where the returning ships were met by cheering crowds. Beatty was vaunted as a hero, although he had taken little part in the action or planning of the raid, which was led by Commodore Tyrwhitt and conceived by him and Keyes, who had persuaded the Admiralty to adopt it. The raid might have led to disaster had the additional forces under Beatty not been sent by Admiral John Jellicoe at the last minute. The German government and the Kaiser in particular, restricted the freedom of action of the German fleet, instructing it to avoid any contact with superior forces for several months thereafter. The battle took place less than a month after the British declaration of war against Germany on 5 August 1914. The war on land went badly for the French and their allies at the Battle of the Frontiers, the German invasion of France. British naval tactics had typically involved a close blockade of ports and this had been the British plan for war against Germany up to 1913. The Admiralty had realised that the advent of submarines armed with torpedoes and mines meant that operations involving capital ships near an opponent's ports would place them at great risk of surprise attack. Ships would be obliged to keep moving and return to port every few days to refuel. The German navy had expected that Britain would adopt its traditional approach and had invested in submarines and coast defences. The main body of the German navy—the High Seas Fleet (HSF)—was smaller than the British Grand Fleet stationed around home waters and could not expect victory in a fleet engagement. The HSF adopted a strategy of waiting in defended home ports for opportunities to attack the larger British force. The British adopted a strategy of distant blockade, patrolling the North Sea rather than waters close to Germany. If German ships sailed, they must either pass the 20 mi (17 nmi; 32 km)-wide Straits of Dover, defended by British submarines and mine barrages or the North Sea, where the Home Fleet was stationed at Scapa Flow in Orkney, defending the 200 mi (170 nmi; 320 km)-wide narrow point between Britain and Norway. The German ships were contained in an area where they could not attack Allied merchant shipping; to keep the HSF in harbour, the British made occasional forays with the Grand Fleet and patrolled with smaller cruiser and battlecruiser squadrons.

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>Surprised, outnumbered and outgunned, three German light cruisers and one destroyer were sunk, three light cruisers were damaged, 712 sailors killed, 530 injured and 336 taken prisoner. The British only suffered casualties of 35 killed and 40 wounded, one light cruiser and three destroyers damaged. Despite the inequality of the fight, the battle was regarded as a great victory in Britain, where the returning ships were met by cheering crowds. ⇒(英国軍の)急襲や兵員・武器の数的優位などによって、ドイツ軍の軽巡洋艦3隻と駆逐艦1隻が沈没し、軽巡洋艦3隻が損傷し、水兵712人が死亡し、530人が負傷し、336人が捕虜となった。英国軍では、35人が死亡し、40人が負傷し、軽巡洋艦1隻と駆逐艦3隻が被害を受けた。こうした戦況の不均衡にもかかわらず、英本国ではこれが大勝利の戦いと見なされ、帰還船団は歓呼する群衆に迎えられた。 >Beatty was vaunted as a hero, although he had taken little part in the action or planning of the raid, which was led by Commodore Tyrwhitt and conceived by him and Keyes, who had persuaded the Admiralty to adopt it. The raid might have led to disaster had the additional forces under Beatty not been sent by Admiral John Jellicoe at the last minute. The German government and the Kaiser in particular, restricted the freedom of action of the German fleet, instructing it to avoid any contact with superior forces for several months thereafter. The battle took place less than a month after the British declaration of war against Germany on 5 August 1914. ⇒ビーティは英雄として自慢の種とされたが、彼は襲撃の戦闘行動や計画にはほとんど関与しなかった。それはティルウィット艦隊司令官が率い、それを採用するよう提督に説得したキーズやティルウィットによって主導されたものだった。土壇場にあった時、ジョン・ジェリコー提督からビーティの元に追加の部隊が派遣されていなかったら、襲撃は大惨事につながっていたかもしれなかった。ドイツ政府とカイザー(皇帝)、特に後者は、ドイツ軍艦隊の戦闘行動の自由を制限し、その後数か月間は優勢な軍団との接触を避けるように指示した。戦いは、ドイツに対する英国の宣戦布告の後1か月以内の1914年8月5日に起こった。 >The war on land went badly for the French and their allies at the Battle of the Frontiers, the German invasion of France. British naval tactics had typically involved a close blockade of ports and this had been the British plan for war against Germany up to 1913. The Admiralty had realised that the advent of submarines armed with torpedoes and mines meant that operations involving capital ships near an opponent's ports would place them at great risk of surprise attack. Ships would be obliged to keep moving and return to port every few days to refuel. ⇒ドイツ軍がフランスを侵略した「国境の戦い」での陸上における戦いは、フランスおよび連合国軍にとって具合の悪い経過をたどった。英国海軍の典型的戦術は、港の綿密な封鎖で、これは1913年まで対ドイツ戦争用の英国的な計画であった。海軍本部は、相手港の近くで主力艦を含む作戦行動をとると、魚雷や機雷で武装した潜水艦の出現で急襲攻撃の大きな危険に晒されることを認識していた。船舶は、動き続けて、燃料補給のため数日ごとに港に戻る義務を負うものとされた。 >The German navy had expected that Britain would adopt its traditional approach and had invested in submarines and coast defences. The main body of the German navy—the High Seas Fleet (HSF)—was smaller than the British Grand Fleet stationed around home waters and could not expect victory in a fleet engagement. The HSF adopted a strategy of waiting in defended home ports for opportunities to attack the larger British force. The British adopted a strategy of distant blockade, patrolling the North Sea rather than waters close to Germany. ⇒ドイツ海軍は、英国軍が伝統的な手法を採用して潜水艦や沿岸防衛に(資源)投入するものと予想していた。ドイツ海軍の主要部隊 ―公海艦隊(HSF)― は、本国周辺の公海に配置された英国大艦隊よりも小規模で、艦隊同士の交戦で勝利を期待することはできなかった。HSFは、援護を受けられる自国の港湾で、より大きな英国軍を攻撃する機会を待つという戦略を採択した。英国軍は、ドイツに近い海域ではなく、北海を巡回する遠距離封鎖戦略を採用した。 >If German ships sailed, they must either pass the 20 mi (17 nmi; 32 km)-wide Straits of Dover, defended by British submarines and mine barrages or the North Sea, where the Home Fleet was stationed at Scapa Flow in Orkney, defending the 200 mi (170 nmi; 320 km)-wide narrow point between Britain and Norway. The German ships were contained in an area where they could not attack Allied merchant shipping; to keep the HSF in harbour, the British made occasional forays with the Grand Fleet and patrolled with smaller cruiser and battle cruiser squadrons. ⇒ドイツ軍艦船が航海する場合、英国軍の潜水艦や機雷の弾幕で守られた20マイル(17海里;32キロ)幅のドーバー海峡を通るか、または英本国艦隊がオークニーのスカパ・フローに駐留して英国とノルウェーの間の幅200マイル(170海里;320キロ)の狭い海域を守っている、北海を通らなければならなかった。ドイツ艦隊は連合国の商船を攻撃できない地域に収容されていた。HSFを湾内に停泊させ続けるために、英国軍は時折大艦隊をもって侵略・略奪し、小型の巡洋艦や駆逐艦隊をもって巡回していた。

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