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Attempts to hold the ground between the black and green lines failed due to the communication breakdown, the speed of the German advance and worsening visibility as the rain increased during the afternoon. The 55th and 15th division brigades beyond the black line, were rolled up from north to south and either retreated or were overrun. It took until 6:00 p.m. for the Germans to reach the Steenbeek, as the downpour added to the mud and flooding in the valley. When the Germans were 300 yards (270 m) from the black line, the British stopped the German advance with artillery and machine-gun fire. The success of the British advance in the centre of the front caused serious concern to the Germans. The defensive system was designed to deal with some penetration but it was meant to prevent the 4,000-yard (3,700 m) advance that XVIII and XIX Corps had achieved. German reserves from the vicinity of Passchendaele, had been able to begin their counter-attack at 11:00–11:30 a.m. when the three British brigades facing the counter-attack by regiments of the German 221st and 50th Reserve Divisions of Group Ypres, were depleted and thinly spread. The British brigades could not communicate with their artillery due to the rain and because the Germans also used smoke shell in their creeping barrage. The German counter-attack was able to drive the British back from the green line along the Zonnebek–Langemarck road, pushing XIX Corps back to the black line. The Germans also recaptured St Julien just west of the green line on the XVIII Corps front, where the counter-attack was stopped by mud, artillery and machine-gun fire. The three most advanced British brigades had lost 70 percent casualties by the time they had withdrawn from the green line. On the flanks of the Entente attack, German counter-attacks had little success. In the XIV Corps area, German attacks made no impression against British troops, who had had time to dig in but managed to push back a small bridgehead of the 38th Division from the east bank of the Steenbeek, after having suffered heavy losses from British artillery, when advancing around Langemarck.

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>Attempts to hold the ground between the black and green lines failed due to the communication breakdown, the speed of the German advance and worsening visibility as the rain increased during the afternoon. The 55th and 15th division brigades beyond the black line, were rolled up from north to south and either retreated or were overrun. It took until 6:00 p.m. for the Germans to reach the Steenbeek, as the downpour added to the mud and flooding in the valley. When the Germans were 300 yards (270 m) from the black line, the British stopped the German advance with artillery and machine-gun fire. ⇒黒線部と緑線部の間の地面を占拠する試みは、コミュニケーション(手段の)故障、ドイツ軍の前進の速度、および、午後の間に雨が増加したので、可視性の悪化のために失敗した。黒線部を越えた第55、第15師団旅団は、北から南へ巻き返されて、片や退却し、片や蹂躙された。渓谷の泥と氾濫に土砂降りが加わったので、ドイツ軍がシュテーンベークへ着くのに午後6時までかかった。ドイツ軍が黒線部から300ヤード(270m)地点にあったとき、英国軍がドイツ軍の前方に大砲と機関銃砲を放って足止めさせた。 >The success of the British advance in the centre of the front caused serious concern to the Germans. The defensive system was designed to deal with some penetration but it was meant to prevent the 4,000-yard (3,700 m) advance that XVIII and XIX Corps had achieved. German reserves from the vicinity of Passchendaele, had been able to begin their counter-attack at 11:00–11:30 a.m. when the three British brigades facing the counter-attack by regiments of the German 221st and 50th Reserve Divisions of Group Ypres, were depleted and thinly spread. ⇒英国軍が前線中央部での進軍を成功させたので、それがドイツ軍に深刻な懸念を引き起こした。防御システムは一定の侵入に対処するようにはなっていたが、第XVIII、第XIX軍団が成し遂げたその進軍は、4,000ヤード(3,700m)にわたっての(彼らに対する)を防御を意味した。午前11時-11時30分に、グループ・イープル所属のドイツ軍第221、第50予備師団の数連隊による反撃に直面していた、英国軍3個旅団(の員数)が減少して薄く広がったので、パッシェンデール付近から来たドイツ軍予備隊が反撃を開始することができた。 >The British brigades could not communicate with their artillery due to the rain and because the Germans also used smoke shell in their creeping barrage. The German counter-attack was able to drive the British back from the green line along the Zonnebek–Langemarck road, pushing XIX Corps back to the black line. The Germans also recaptured St Julien just west of the green line on the XVIII Corps front, where the counter-attack was stopped by mud, artillery and machine-gun fire. The three most advanced British brigades had lost 70 percent casualties by the time they had withdrawn from the green line. ⇒英国軍の旅団は、自軍の砲兵隊と連絡をとることができなかったが、それは雨によるとともに、ドイツ軍が纏いつく集中砲火で煙幕弾を使用したからでもあった。ドイツ軍の反撃は、ゾンネベケ-ランゲマーク道に沿った緑線部から英国軍を追い返すことができて、第XIX部隊を黒線部に押し戻した。ドイツ軍はまた、ちょうど第XVIII軍団前線上の緑線部の西でサン・ジュリアンを奪回したが、そこで、反撃は泥地や大砲・機関銃の砲火によって止められた。最先進の英国軍3個旅団は、緑線部から撤退する頃には、70%の犠牲者を失っていた。 >On the flanks of the Entente attack, German counter-attacks had little success. In the XIV Corps area, German attacks made no impression against British troops, who had had time to dig in but managed to push back a small bridgehead of the 38th Division from the east bank of the Steenbeek, after having suffered heavy losses from British artillery, when advancing around Langemarck. ⇒協商国軍攻撃隊の側面に対するドイツ軍の反撃は、ほとんど成功を見なかった。第XIV軍団地域では、英国軍隊に対してドイツ軍が攻撃しているという印象がなかった。彼らドイツ軍は塹壕掘りに時間を費やしていたが、しかし、シュテーンベーク東岸の小さな橋頭堡から英国軍第38師団を何とか押し戻すことができた。ただしそれは、ランゲマーク周辺を進軍する英国軍の砲撃で大きな損害を被った後ではあったが。 ※全体的にぎこちない訳文になってしまいました。すみません。

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