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At 13:5, the ships formed into a line abreast formation 15 mi (13.0 nmi; 24.1 km) apart, with Glasgow at the eastern end, and started to steam north at 10 nautical miles (19 km; 12 mi) searching for Leipzig. At 16:17 Leipzig, accompanied by the other German ships, spotted smoke from the line of British ships. Spee ordered full speed so that Scharnhorst, Gneisenau and Leipzig were approaching the British at 20 nautical miles (37 km; 23 mi), with the slower light cruisers Dresden and Nürnberg some way behind. At 16:20, Glasgow and Otranto saw smoke to the north and then three ships at a range of 12 mi (10.4 nmi; 19.3 km). The British reversed direction, so that both fleets were moving south, and a chase began which lasted 90 minutes. Cradock was faced with a choice; he could either take his three cruisers capable of 20 kn (23 mph; 37 km/h), abandon Otranto and run from the Germans, or stay and fight with Otranto, which could only manage 16 kn (18 mph; 30 km/h). The German ships slowed at a range of 15,000 yd (13,720 m) to reorganise themselves for best positions, and to await best visibility, when the British to their west would be outlined against the setting sun. At 17:10, Cradock decided he must fight, and drew his ships closer together. He changed course to south-east and attempted to close upon the German ships while the sun remained high. Spee declined to engage and turned his faster ships away, maintaining the distance between the forces which sailed roughly parallel at a distance of 14,000 yd (12,800 m). At 18:18, Cradock again attempted to close, steering directly towards the enemy, which once again turned away to a greater range of 18,000 yd (16,460 m). At 18:50, the sun set; Spee closed to 12,000 yd (10,970 m) and commenced firing. The German ships had sixteen 21 cm (8 in) guns of comparable range to the two 9.2 in (234 mm) guns on Good Hope. One of these was hit within five minutes of the engagement's starting. Of the remaining 6 in (152 mm) guns on the British ships, most were in casemates along the sides of the ships, which continually flooded if the gun doors were opened to fire in heavy seas. The merchant cruiser Otranto—having only 4 in (100 mm) guns and being a much larger target than the other ships—retired west at full speed. Since the British 6 in (152 mm) guns had insufficient range to match the German 21 cm (8 in) guns, Cradock attempted to close on the German ships. By 19:30, he had reached 6,000 yd (5,490 m) but as he closed, the German fire became correspondingly more accurate. Good Hope and Monmouth caught fire, presenting easy targets to the German gunners now that darkness had fallen, whereas the German ships had disappeared into the dark. Monmouth was first to be silenced. Good Hope continued firing, continuing to close on the German ships and receiving more and more fire. By 19:50, she had also ceased firing; subsequently her forward section exploded, then she broke apart and sank, with no-one witness to the sinking.

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>At 13:5, the ships formed ~ some way behind. ⇒13時5分、船隊はグラスゴー号を東端にして15マイル(13.0海里; 24.1キロ)離れた直線上に並び、ライプツィヒ号を探して10海里(19キロ; 12マイル)(の速度)で北に向かって航海し始めた。16時17分に英国船の列から、他のドイツ軍の船と一緒にいるライプツィヒ号の煙が発見された。シュペーは、20海里(37キロ; 23マイル)で航行する英国船に接近するようシャルンホルスト号、グナイセナウ号、ライプツィッヒ号に全速航行を命じたところ、遅い軽巡洋艦ドレスデン号とニュルンベルク号が少し遅れた。 >At 16:20, Glasgow and Otranto ~ against the setting sun. ⇒16時20分、グラスゴー号とオトラント号は北方向に煙を視認した後、12マイル(10.4海里;19.3キロ)の範囲に3隻の船舶を目撃した。英国軍は方向を逆転したので、両方の艦隊が南へ移動しながら追跡が始まり、それが90分続いた。クラドックは選択(問題)に直面した。オトラント号は16ノット(18マイル; 30キロ毎時)しか出せないので、20ノット(23マイル; 37キロ毎時)の能力を持つ3隻の巡洋艦のみを連れ、オトラント号を放棄してドイツ軍から逃走するか、それとも一緒に留まってともに戦うかのどちらかであった。ドイツ軍の艦船は15000ヤード(13,720m)の速度に減速し、最高の位置取りに再編成され、英国軍が彼らの西側に来て沈む夕日を背にして輪郭が描かれるときの、最高の視界(が得られる瞬間)を待った。 >At 17:10, Cradock decided ~ and commenced firing. ⇒17時10分、クラドックは戦わなければならないと決心し、自軍の船舶をより近くに引き寄せた。彼は進路を南東に変えて、太陽が高いうちにドイツ軍の船に近づこうとした。シュペーは、交戦を回避して彼の速い船から離れ、両部隊間の距離を14000ヤード(12,800m)に維持しつつ、ほぼ平行に航行した。18時18分、クラドックは再び敵対者の方を向いて接近しようとしたが、敵艦も再び18000ヤード(16,460m)の範囲に広げた。18時50分、日が沈んだ。シュペーは12000ヤード(10,970m)に接近して発砲を始めた。 >The German ships had ~ west at full speed. ⇒ドイツ軍の艦隊は、グッドホープ号の2門の9.2インチ(234ミリ)砲の射程に匹敵する21センチ(8インチ)砲を16門持っていた。前者の2門うちの1つは、交戦開始から5分以内に打撃を受けた。英国艦の残りの6インチ(152ミリ)砲のうち、大部分は艦の舷側面に沿った砲郭内にあり、荒海で砲郭の扉が開かれると、継続的な浸水に見舞われた。商業巡洋艦オトラント号は、― 4インチ(100ミリ)砲しか持たず、(しかも)他の船よりもはるかに大きな標的だったので― 全速力で西方へ引き下がった。 >Since the British 6 in (152 mm) guns ~ witness to the sinking. ⇒英国軍の6インチ(152ミリ)砲は、ドイツ軍の21センチ(8インチ)砲に匹敵するほど十分な射程距離を持っていなかったので、クラドックはドイツ艦に接近しようとした。19時30分までで6,000ヤード(5,490 m)に到達したが、彼が接近したときドイツ軍の砲火は対応してより正確になった。グッドホープ号とモンマス号が発砲し、暗闇の帳(とばり)が落ちた今はドイツ軍の砲手たちに簡単な標的を提示してしまったのに対し、ドイツ軍の船艦は暗闇の中に消え去った。モンマス号が最初に沈黙することになった。グッドホープ号は射撃を続け、ドイツ軍の艦船に迫り続けたので、ますます多くの砲火を浴びた。19時50分までにはこれも発砲をやめた。その後グッドホープ号の前部が爆発し、それからバラバラになって沈没していったが、沈没を目撃した人は一人もいなかった。

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