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The Battle of Dogger Bank was a naval engagement on 24 January 1915, near the Dogger Bank in the North Sea, during the First World War, between squadrons of the British Grand Fleet and the German High Seas Fleet. The British had intercepted and decoded German wireless transmissions, gaining advance knowledge that a German raiding squadron was heading for Dogger Bank and ships of the Grand Fleet sailed to intercept the raiders. The British surprised the smaller and slower German squadron, which fled for home. During a stern chase lasting several hours, the British caught up with the Germans and engaged them with long-range gunfire. The British disabled Blücher, the rearmost German ship, and the Germans put the British flagship HMS Lion out of action. Due to inadequate signalling, the remaining British ships stopped the pursuit to sink Blücher; by the time the ship had been sunk, the rest of the German squadron had escaped. The German squadron returned to harbour, with some ships in need of extensive repairs. Lion made it back to port but was out of action for several months. The British had lost no ships and suffered few casualties; the Germans had lost Blücher and most of its crew, so the action was considered a British victory. Both navies replaced officers who were thought to have shown poor judgement and made changes to equipment and procedures, to remedy failings observed during the battle. Before 1914, international communication was conducted via undersea cables laid along shipping lanes, most of which were under British control. Hours after the British ultimatum to Germany in August 1914, they cut German cables. German messages could be passed only by wireless, using cyphers to disguise their content. The Signalbuch der Kaiserlichen Marine (SKM) was captured from the German light cruiser SMS Magdeburg after it ran aground in the Baltic on 26 August 1914. The German-Australian steamer Hobart was seized near Melbourne, Australia on 11 August and the Handelsverkehrsbuch (HVB) codebook, used by the German navy to communicate with merchant ships and within the High Seas Fleet, was captured. A copy of the book was sent to England by the fastest steamer, arriving at the end of October. During the Battle off Texel (17 October), the commander of the German destroyer SMS S119 threw overboard his secret papers in a lead lined chest as the ship sank but on 30 November, a British trawler dragged up the chest. Room 40 gained a copy of the Verkehrsbuch (VB) codebook, normally used by Flag officers of the Kaiserliche Marine. The Battle of Dogger Bank ドッガー・バンク海戦

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>The Battle of Dogger Bank was a naval engagement on 24 January 1915, near the Dogger Bank in the North Sea, during the First World War, between squadrons of the British Grand Fleet and the German High Seas Fleet. ⇒「ドッガー・バンク海戦」は、1915年1月24日、第一次世界大戦中に北海のドッガー・バンクの近くで、英国大艦隊とドイツ公海艦隊の戦隊同士の間で行われた。 >The British had intercepted and decoded German wireless transmissions, gaining advance knowledge that a German raiding squadron was heading for Dogger Bank and ships of the Grand Fleet sailed to intercept the raiders. The British surprised the smaller and slower German squadron, which fled for home. During a stern chase lasting several hours, the British caught up with the Germans and engaged them with long-range gunfire. ⇒英国軍は、ドイツ軍の無線通信を傍受して解読し、ドイツ軍の襲撃戦隊がドッガー・バンクに向かっているという事前の知識を得たので、襲撃隊を阻止するために英国大艦隊の船隊が出航した。英国軍は、ドイツ軍の小規模で遅い戦隊を急襲したところ、ドイツ軍戦隊は自国方面へ逃げた。数時間続いた厳しい追撃の間に、英国軍はドイツ軍に追いつき、長距離砲撃を行なった。 >The British disabled Blücher, the rearmost German ship, and the Germans put the British flagship HMS Lion out of action. Due to inadequate signalling, the remaining British ships stopped the pursuit to sink Blücher; by the time the ship had been sunk, the rest of the German squadron had escaped. The German squadron returned to harbour, with some ships in need of extensive repairs. ⇒英国軍はドイツ軍の最後尾の船艦ブリュッヒャー号を戦闘無能にし、ドイツ軍は英国軍の旗艦HMSライオン号の行動を封じた。不十分な信号のため、残りの英国軍船艦はブリュッヒャー号を沈めるための追跡を中止した。船が沈む頃には、ドイツ軍の残りの部隊は逃げ出していた。ドイツ軍戦隊は港に戻ったが、一部の船艦は大規模な修理が必要となっていた。 >Lion made it back to port but was out of action for several months. The British had lost no ships and suffered few casualties; the Germans had lost Blücher and most of its crew, so the action was considered a British victory. Both navies replaced officers who were thought to have shown poor judgement and made changes to equipment and procedures, to remedy failings observed during the battle. Before 1914, international communication was conducted via undersea cables laid along shipping lanes, most of which were under British control. ⇒ライオン号は港に戻ったが、数か月間は戦闘行動に出なかった。英国軍は船艦を失うこともなかったし、犠牲者もほとんど出なかった。ドイツ軍はブリュッヒャー号とその乗組員のほとんどを失ったため、この戦闘行動は英国軍の勝利と見なされた。両方の海軍は、戦闘中に観察された失敗を改善するために、低い判断力を露呈したと考えられる将校を交代させ、装備や手順を変更した。1914年以前は、海運航路に敷設された海底ケーブルを介して国際通信が行われていたが、そのほとんどは英国軍の管理下にあった。 >Hours after the British ultimatum to Germany in August 1914, they cut German cables. German messages could be passed only by wireless, using cyphers to disguise their content. The Signalbuch der Kaiserlichen Marine (SKM) was captured from the German light cruiser SMS Magdeburg after it ran aground in the Baltic on 26 August 1914. The German-Australian steamer Hobart was seized near Melbourne, Australia on 11 August and the Handelsverkehrsbuch (HVB) codebook, used by the German navy to communicate with merchant ships and within the High Seas Fleet, was captured. ⇒1914年8月、英国軍によるドイツへの最後通告の数時間後、彼らはドイツ軍のケーブルを切断した。(それで)ドイツからのメッセージは、内容を偽装するために暗号を使用して、無線で伝えることしかできなくなった。1914年8月26日にドイツ軍の軽巡洋艦SMSマクデブルク号がバルト海で座礁した後、帝国海軍のシグナルブック(信号書、SKM)が捕獲された。ドイツ‐オーストラリア(航路)の汽船ホバート号が、8月11日にオーストラリアのメルボルン近海で包囲攻撃され、商船と公海艦隊内で通信するためにドイツ海軍が使用する通商貿易書(HVB)のコードブック(暗号書)が捕獲された。 >A copy of the book was sent to England by the fastest steamer, arriving at the end of October. During the Battle off Texel (17 October), the commander of the German destroyer SMS S119 threw overboard his secret papers in a lead lined chest as the ship sank but on 30 November, a British trawler dragged up the chest. Room 40 gained a copy of the Verkehrsbuch (VB) codebook, normally used by Flag officers of the Kaiserliche Marine. ⇒この(暗号)本のコピーが、10月末に到着した最速の汽船によって英国に送られた。「テクセル沖の戦い」(10月17日)で、ドイツ軍の駆逐艦SMS S119号の指揮官は、船が沈むときに秘密の書類を船首に並べて投棄したが、11月30日に英国のトロール船が金庫を引き上げた。「部屋40」には、通常帝国海軍の将校旗士が使用する交信書(VB)の暗号書のコピーがあった。

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