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Hipper suspected that the British had received advanced warning about earlier operations of the HSF from spy ships mingling with British and Dutch fishing boats, operating near the German Bight and the Dogger Bank, to observe German fleet movements. Hipper considered that with the Dogger Bank mid-way on the short route to the English coast, a signal from a trawler could reach the British in time for the British battlecruisers to intercept a German sortie, certainly on the return journey. Hipper ordered German ships vigorously to enforce search and seizure rules, bringing fishing boats into Cuxhaven to be searched. Buoyed by the success of the raid on the English coast, Admiral Hipper planned an attack for next month on the British fishing fleet on the Dogger Bank. The German fleet had increased in size since the outbreak of war, with the arrival in service of the König-class dreadnought battleships SMS König, Grosser Kurfürst, Markgraf and Kronprinz of the 3rd Battle Squadron and the Derfflinger-class battlecruiser Derfflinger. Hipper intended to clear the bank of British fishing vessels and dubious neutrals and to attack any small British warships in the area, with the HSF covering the withdrawal of the battlecruisers. The limited nature of the operation conformed to the ban by the Kaiser on operations by the High Seas Fleet, that had been reiterated on 10 January. A slightly more aggressive strategy was permitted, within the policy of keeping the HSF in being, in which the fleet could sortie to attempt to isolate and destroy advanced British forces or to attack the Grand Fleet if in greater strength. On 19 January, Beatty had reconnoitred the area west of the German Bight and been seen by a German aircraft. The reconnaissance and British activity at the Dogger Bank led Ingenohl to order Hipper and the I Scouting Group to survey the area and surprise and destroy any light forces found there. The I Scouting Group contained the battlecruisers Seydlitz (flagship), Moltke, Derfflinger and Blucher, four light cruisers and eighteen destroyers. Transmissions from German ships in the Jade River on 23 January 1915, intercepted and decoded by Room 40, alerted the British to a German sortie in force as far as the Dogger Bank. At the Admiralty, Wilson, Oliver and Churchill arranged a plan to confront the Germans with a superior opponent. A rendezvous was set for 24 January at 07:00 am, 30 nmi (56 km; 35 mi) north of the Dogger Bank and about 180 nmi (330 km; 210 mi) west of Heligoland.

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>Hipper suspected that the British had received advanced warning about earlier operations of the HSF from spy ships mingling with British and Dutch fishing boats, operating near the German Bight and the Dogger Bank, to observe German fleet movements. Hipper considered that with the Dogger Bank* mid-way on the short route to the English coast, a signal from a trawler could reach the British in time for the British battlecruisers** to intercept a German sortie, certainly on the return journey. ⇒ヒッペルは、ドイツ軍艦隊の動きを観察するためにドイツ湾やドッガー・バンク*の近くで操業している英国やオランダの漁船群に混ざったスパイ船(の情報)から、英国軍がHSFの初期作戦について事前警告を受けていることを疑った。ヒッペルは、英国沿岸への短い海路の途中でドッガー・バンクを使うと英国軍の巡洋戦艦**がドイツ軍の出撃を阻止するのに間に合うようにトロール船からの信号が英国軍に届けられるのかも知れないと考えた。 *Dogger Bank「ドッガー・バンク」:北海の、北イングランドとデンマークの中間にある漁場。/**battlecruiser:「巡洋戦艦」(通常の戦艦より軽装甲で高速)。 >Hipper ordered German ships vigorously to enforce search and seizure rules, bringing fishing boats into Cuxhaven to be searched. Buoyed by the success of the raid on the English coast, Admiral Hipper planned an attack for next month on the British fishing fleet on the Dogger Bank. The German fleet had increased in size since the outbreak of war, with the arrival in service of the König-class dreadnought battleships SMS König, Grosser Kurfürst, Markgraf and Kronprinz of the 3rd Battle Squadron and the Derfflinger-class battlecruiser Derfflinger. ⇒ヒッペルはドイツ軍艦船に捜索およびさし押さえ規則(の断行)を徹底的に命じ、漁船をクックスハーフェンに連行し、捜索させた。ヒッペル提督はその翌月、英国沿岸での襲撃の成功に支えられてドッガー・バンクにある英国の漁船隊に対する攻撃を計画した。ドイツ軍艦隊は戦争の勃発以来規模が拡大したが、それは戦役用に第3戦隊のケーニヒ級弩級戦艦SMSケーニヒ号、グロッサー・クルフュルスト(大選帝侯)号、マルクグラフ号、およびクロンプリンツ号、それとデルフィンガー級巡洋戦艦デルフィンガー号が到着したからであった。 >Hipper intended to clear the bank of British fishing vessels and dubious neutrals and to attack any small British warships in the area, with the HSF covering the withdrawal of the battlecruisers. The limited nature of the operation conformed to the ban by the Kaiser on operations by the High Seas Fleet, that had been reiterated on 10 January. A slightly more aggressive strategy was permitted, within the policy of keeping the HSF in being, in which the fleet could sortie to attempt to isolate and destroy advanced British forces or to attack the Grand Fleet if in greater strength. ⇒ヒッペルは、HSFをもって巡洋戦艦の撤退を援護しつつ、英国の漁船と疑わしい中立の船列を一掃し、この海域の英国軍小艦をすべて攻撃することを意図した。限定つき作戦の性質が、公海艦隊による作戦行動に関する皇帝の禁止(事項)に適合したので、1月10日にも繰り返された。HSFを維持するという方針の範囲内で、少しだけ攻撃性を加えた戦略が許可され、この艦隊は出撃して先行の英国軍を隔離して破壊するか、より強力な場合には大艦隊を攻撃することがあり得た。 ※この段落、内容がいまいちよく分かりません。誤訳の節はどうぞ悪しからず。 >On 19 January, Beatty had reconnoitred the area west of the German Bight and been seen by a German aircraft. The reconnaissance and British activity at the Dogger Bank led Ingenohl to order Hipper and the I Scouting Group to survey the area and surprise and destroy any light forces found there. The I Scouting Group contained the battlecruisers Seydlitz (flagship), Moltke, Derfflinger and Blucher, four light cruisers and eighteen destroyers. ⇒1月19日、ビーティはドイツ湾の西側海域を偵察していて、ドイツ軍の航空機に発見された。ドッガー・バンクでの偵察と英国の活動によって触発されたインゲノールは、ヒッペルと第I偵察グループにこの地域を調査し、そこにあるすべての軽軍団を急襲して破壊するよう命じた。第I偵察グループには巡洋戦艦セイドリッツ号(旗艦)、モルトケ号、デルフリンゲル号、ブルッヒャー号、軽巡洋艦4隻、駆逐艦18隻が含まれていた。 >Transmissions from German ships in the Jade River on 23 January 1915, intercepted and decoded by Room 40, alerted the British to a German sortie in force as far as the Dogger Bank. At the Admiralty, Wilson, Oliver and Churchill arranged a plan to confront the Germans with a superior opponent. A rendezvous was set for 24 January at 07:00 am, 30 nmi (56 km; 35 mi) north of the Dogger Bank and about 180 nmi (330 km; 210 mi) west of Heligoland. ⇒1940年1月23日に、ヤーデ川でドイツ軍船隊から送信され、「部屋40」で傍受され、解読されたため、すでに英国軍はドッガー・バンクまでのドイツ軍出撃の警告を受けた。海軍本部では、ウィルソン、オリバー、およびチャーチルが、優れた敵対勢力のドイツ軍に対峙する計画を立てた。ドッガー・バンクの北30海里(56キロ; 35マイル)、ヘリゴランドの西約180海里(330キロ; 210マイル)において1月24日午前7時の軍艦集結策が設定された。

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    The Battle of Dogger Bank was a naval engagement on 24 January 1915, near the Dogger Bank in the North Sea, during the First World War, between squadrons of the British Grand Fleet and the German High Seas Fleet. The British had intercepted and decoded German wireless transmissions, gaining advance knowledge that a German raiding squadron was heading for Dogger Bank and ships of the Grand Fleet sailed to intercept the raiders. The British surprised the smaller and slower German squadron, which fled for home. During a stern chase lasting several hours, the British caught up with the Germans and engaged them with long-range gunfire. The British disabled Blücher, the rearmost German ship, and the Germans put the British flagship HMS Lion out of action. Due to inadequate signalling, the remaining British ships stopped the pursuit to sink Blücher; by the time the ship had been sunk, the rest of the German squadron had escaped. The German squadron returned to harbour, with some ships in need of extensive repairs. Lion made it back to port but was out of action for several months. The British had lost no ships and suffered few casualties; the Germans had lost Blücher and most of its crew, so the action was considered a British victory. Both navies replaced officers who were thought to have shown poor judgement and made changes to equipment and procedures, to remedy failings observed during the battle. Before 1914, international communication was conducted via undersea cables laid along shipping lanes, most of which were under British control. Hours after the British ultimatum to Germany in August 1914, they cut German cables. German messages could be passed only by wireless, using cyphers to disguise their content. The Signalbuch der Kaiserlichen Marine (SKM) was captured from the German light cruiser SMS Magdeburg after it ran aground in the Baltic on 26 August 1914. The German-Australian steamer Hobart was seized near Melbourne, Australia on 11 August and the Handelsverkehrsbuch (HVB) codebook, used by the German navy to communicate with merchant ships and within the High Seas Fleet, was captured. A copy of the book was sent to England by the fastest steamer, arriving at the end of October. During the Battle off Texel (17 October), the commander of the German destroyer SMS S119 threw overboard his secret papers in a lead lined chest as the ship sank but on 30 November, a British trawler dragged up the chest. Room 40 gained a copy of the Verkehrsbuch (VB) codebook, normally used by Flag officers of the Kaiserliche Marine. The Battle of Dogger Bank ドッガー・バンク海戦

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