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Hampshire, named to commemorate the English county, was laid down by Armstrong Whitworth at their Elswick shipyard on 1 September 1902 and launched on 24 September 1903. She was completed on 15 July 1905 and was initially assigned to the 1st Cruiser Squadron of the Channel Fleet together with most of her sister ships. She began a refit at Portsmouth Royal Dockyard in December 1908 and was then assigned to the reserve Third Fleet in August 1909. She recommissioned in December 1911 for her assignment with the 6th Cruiser Squadron of the Mediterranean Fleet and was transferred to the China Station in 1912. When the war began, she was in Wei Hai Wei, and was assigned to the small squadron led by Vice Admiral Martyn Jerram, commander-in-chief of the China Station. She was ordered to destroy the German radio station at Yap together with the armoured cruiser Minotaur and the light cruiser Newcastle. En route the ships captured the collier SS Elspeth on 11 August and sank her; Hampshire was too short on coal by then to make the island so Jerram ordered her back to Hong Kong with the crew of the Elspeth. At the end of the month, she was ordered down to the Dutch East Indies to search for any German ships at sea, narrowly missing the German light cruiser Emden. The German ship had not been reported since the war began and she sailed into the Bay of Bengal and began preying upon unsuspecting British shipping beginning on 14 September.

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  • 回答No.1
  • Nakay702
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>Hampshire, named to commemorate the English county, was laid down by Armstrong Whitworth at their Elswick shipyard on 1 September 1902 and launched on 24 September 1903. She was completed on 15 July 1905 and was initially assigned to the 1st Cruiser Squadron of the Channel Fleet together with most of her sister ships. She began a refit at Portsmouth Royal Dockyard in December 1908 and was then assigned to the reserve Third Fleet in August 1909. She recommissioned in December 1911 for her assignment with the 6th Cruiser Squadron of the Mediterranean Fleet and was transferred to the China Station in 1912. ⇒ハンプシャー号は、英国の旧家を記念して名づけられたが、1902年9月1日にアームストロング・ホイットワースによって彼らのエルズウィック造船所で建造され、1903年9月24日に進水した。本船は1905年7月15日に完成されて、まず最初に大部分の姉妹船とともに海峡艦隊の第1巡洋艦戦隊に編入された。1908年12月にポーツマス・ロイヤル造船所で修理を開始して、それから1909年8月に第3予備艦隊に割り当てられた。本船は地中海艦隊の第6巡洋艦戦隊とともに、1911年12月に再割り当てを受け、1912年に中国基地に転属になった。 >When the war began, she was in Wei Hai Wei, and was assigned to the small squadron led by Vice Admiral Martyn Jerram, commander-in-chief of the China Station. She was ordered to destroy the German radio station at Yap together with the armoured cruiser Minotaur and the light cruiser Newcastle. En route the ships captured the collier SS Elspeth on 11 August and sank her; Hampshire was too short on coal by then to make the island so Jerram ordered her back to Hong Kong with the crew of the Elspeth. ⇒戦争が始まったとき、本船は威海にあったが、中国基地の司令官マーティン・ジェラム中将によって小さな戦隊に割り当てられた。そして装甲巡洋艦ミノタウロス号および軽巡洋艦ニューキャッスル号とともに、ヤップ島のドイツ軍ラジオ局を破壊するよう命令された。その途中で、それらの巡洋艦は8月11日に石炭船SS(ヒトラー親衛隊)エルペス号を捕えて、これを沈めた。ハンプシャー号は島に着く時までの石炭が不足したので、ジェラムは、本船に対してエルペス号の乗員を乗せて香港に戻るよう命じた。 >At the end of the month, she was ordered down to the Dutch East Indies to search for any German ships at sea, narrowly missing the German light cruiser Emden. The German ship had not been reported since the war began and she sailed into the Bay of Bengal and began preying upon unsuspecting British shipping beginning on 14 September. ⇒それは月末に、海上でドイツ軍の船舶を捜すためにオランダ領東インド諸島へ行くよう命じられたが、間一髪のところでドイツの軽巡洋艦エムデン号を逃した。戦争開始以来、ドイツの船舶は報告されていなかったけれども、9月14日以降それがベンガル湾に入って来て、思いもかけず英国の輸送船を略奪し始めた。

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  • 回答No.5

Nakay702様 ナチスはこの時代に存在していませんよ。(^_^) SSは、この時代から主流になった船舶についた記号で、screw steamerのことだったと記憶しています。

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  • 回答No.4
  • Nakay702
  • ベストアンサー率81% (8667/10649)

kuronekofan様 ご指摘ありがとうございました。 そうですね。「ヒトラー親衛隊」でなく、「ナチ親衛隊」とすべきでした。 ただ、「石炭船」としたのは、SS の部分でなく、collierの対訳です。 なお、このSSは、screw steamerのことでなく、ドイツ語のSchutzstaffel=Schutz「防衛」+Staffel「(飛行)中隊」の略語と見ました。ドイツ語の辞書では、Schutzstaffelで「ナチス親衛隊」(S.S.と略記)となっています。 ということで、Iwano_aoi様、すみませんが、本文中のthe collier SS Elspethを、「SS(ナチ親衛隊)の石炭船エルペス号」と訂正させていただきます。 以上、お礼と訂正とお詫びまで。 Nakay702拝

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  • 回答No.3

すみません。NO2の説明だと誤解をあたえそうですので、 再度の補足です。 SSは重油蒸気エンジン船の記号ですので、 >石炭船SS(ヒトラー親衛隊)エルペス号 訳としては 石炭輸送船SSエルペス号、とするのがよいかとおもいます。

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  • 回答No.2

NO1さんへ 失礼します。補足です。 >石炭船SS(ヒトラー親衛隊) SSは、石炭ではなく重油で動く蒸気エンジン船舶の記号です。HMS同様、あまり訳さず使うのが良いかと思います。 ヒトラー親衛隊は1930年以降なので留意です。

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