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The advance was made in three stages, with an hour to consolidate behind standing and smoke barrages, at the first and intermediate objectives. The rain stopped at midnight and the attack began at 5:20 a.m. On the right, German machine-guns at Olga Farm caused many casualties and a delay but the first objective was reached on time. The surviving troops advanced on Condé House by rushes from shell-holes and took 200 prisoners when they reached it. Fire from two German pillboxes stopped the advance and a German counter-attack began from the pillboxes. German infantry attacked in eight waves and the British engaged them with rifle and machine-gun fire. At 8:55 a.m., the barrage for the advance to the third (final) objective began and smothered the remaining German infantry; German resistance collapsed and the final objective was reached at 10:00 a.m. The left brigade advanced to the right of Bear Copse, which was specially bombarded by Stokes mortars, which induced the German garrison to surrender. The Broembeek was crossed by the Newfoundland battalion, which advanced up the Ypres–Staden railway, captured German dugouts in the embankment and reached the first objective on time. The advance to the second objective found much reduced German resistance and the final objective 700 yd (640 m) further on was reached. A counter-attack was defeated at noon and then a retirement of 200 yd (180 m) was made, in the face of another counter-attack later in the afternoon but German infantry left the area vacant. The Guards Division was to cross the Broembeek and close up to Houthoulst Forest, on a front from the Ypres–Staden railway, to the junction with the French army near Craonne Farm. Before the attack 355 mats, 180 footbridges and enough wire to cover 3,000 yd (2,700 m) of front was carried forward by the pioneer battalion; much digging was done but the rain destroyed trenches as they were built. The two attacking brigades moved up late on 7 October in torrential rain, which stopped at midnight on 8/9 October and the morning dawned fine with a drying wind. The barrage came down prompt at 5:30 a.m. and after four minutes began to creep forward at a rate of 100 yd (91 m) in eight minutes. Crossing the Broembeek was easier than expected, as the German infantry nearby surrendered readily.

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>The advance was made in three stages, with an hour to consolidate behind standing and smoke barrages, at the first and intermediate objectives. The rain stopped at midnight and the attack began at 5:20 a.m. On the right, German machine-guns at Olga Farm caused many casualties and a delay but the first objective was reached on time. The surviving troops advanced on Condé House by rushes from shell-holes and took 200 prisoners when they reached it. ⇒待機と煙幕集中砲火の背後で、強化するための1時間ずつをはさみながら、3段階構えの進軍が第1標的および中間標的で行われた。雨は真夜中にやみ、攻撃は午前5時20分に始まった。右翼では、オルガ農場にいるドイツ軍の機関銃で多くの死傷者数と遅延が引き起こされたが、第1標的には時間どおりに到達した。生残りの軍隊は砲弾痕からコンデ・ハウスに進撃をかけて、それに到達した時200人の囚人を捕縛した。 >Fire from two German pillboxes stopped the advance and a German counter-attack began from the pillboxes. German infantry attacked in eight waves and the British engaged them with rifle and machine-gun fire. At 8:55 a.m., the barrage for the advance to the third (final) objective began and smothered the remaining German infantry; German resistance collapsed and the final objective was reached at 10:00 a.m. The left brigade advanced to the right of Bear Copse, which was specially bombarded by Stokes mortars, which induced the German garrison to surrender. ⇒2か所のドイツ軍ピルボックスからの砲火によって進軍は停止し、ドイツ軍の反撃がピルボックスから始まった。ドイツ軍の歩兵隊は8個部隊の攻撃波で攻撃し、これに対して英国軍はライフル銃と機関銃で交戦した。午前8時55分に、第3(最終)標的への進軍のための集中砲火を開始し、残留ドイツ軍の歩兵を包囲した。ドイツ軍の抵抗は崩壊し、午前10時に最終標的は掌握された。左翼の旅団がベア雑木林の右に進軍し、そこをストークス迫撃砲で特別に砲撃してドイツ軍守備隊を降服に誘導した。 >The Broembeek was crossed by the Newfoundland battalion, which advanced up the Ypres–Staden railway, captured German dugouts in the embankment and reached the first objective on time. The advance to the second objective found much reduced German resistance and the final objective 700 yd (640 m) further on was reached. A counter-attack was defeated at noon and then a retirement of 200 yd (180 m) was made, in the face of another counter-attack later in the afternoon but German infantry left the area vacant. ⇒ニューファウンドランド大隊がブルームベークを横切り、イープル-シュターデン鉄道に向って進軍し、堤防にあるドイツ軍の避難壕を攻略して時間どおりに第1標的に到達した。第2標的への進軍途上では、すっかり数の減ったドイツ軍の抵抗に出会ったが、どんどん進んで700ヤード(640m)先の最終標的まで到達した。正午には反撃隊を破って、それから、午後に別の反撃に直面して200ヤード(180m)後退させられたが、ドイツ軍の歩兵隊もその地域を引き払った。 >The Guards Division was to cross the Broembeek and close up to Houthoulst Forest, on a front from the Ypres–Staden railway, to the junction with the French army near Craonne Farm. Before the attack 355 mats, 180 footbridges and enough wire to cover 3,000 yd (2,700 m) of front was carried forward by the pioneer battalion; much digging was done but the rain destroyed trenches as they were built. ⇒護衛師団は、クラオネ農場近くのフランス方面軍と合流するためにブルームベークを横切ってイープル-シュターデン鉄道から来る前線上を移動し、フーツールスト森林に接近することになっていた。攻撃の前に、3,000ヤード(2,700m)の前線をカバーするために355枚のマット、180か所の歩道橋、十分量の鉄条網が、工兵大隊によって前方へ運ばれた。たくさんの塹壕ができたが、造るが早いか雨に破壊された。 >The two attacking brigades moved up late on 7 October in torrential rain, which stopped at midnight on 8/9 October and the morning dawned fine with a drying wind. The barrage came down prompt at 5:30 a.m. and after four minutes began to creep forward at a rate of 100 yd (91 m) in eight minutes. Crossing the Broembeek was easier than expected, as the German infantry nearby surrendered readily. ⇒10月7日遅くに、2個の攻撃旅団がどしゃ降りの雨の中前線へ出ていって、10月8/9日の真夜中に止まった。その朝の曙は乾燥風のもとの晴天であった。午前5時30分に集中砲火が時間どおりに攻撃開始されて、4分後には前方に纏いつき始め、8分で100ヤード(91m)の移動率で動いた。ブルームベークを横切ることは予想より容易で、すぐに近くのドイツ軍の歩兵が降服したほどであった。

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