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日本語訳を教えてください! In contrast to the manly Henry, an eighteen-year-old girl named Victoria became queen in 1837 and remained a very popular monarch for 65 years. She married Albert, a distant cousin, and they had nine children. Unfortunately, Albert died of typhoid in 1861 when he was only 42. Victoria was so upset that she went into mourning for the rest of her life. She didn't go out to parties, and she wore the quietest of fashion long black dresses with high necks and long sleeves.

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訂正です。 男っぽいヘンリーとは対照的に、18歳の女性で、1837年に女王となるビクトリアがおり、65年にわたり君臨し国民に名を残した。彼女は遠いいとこのアルバートと結婚して九人の子供をもうけた。 不幸にしてアルバートは1861年にチフスでなくなった。42歳だった。ビクトリア女王は大変哀しみ、残りの人生を喪に伏した。パーティーに出ようとせず、ハイネックで長袖の、黒のロングドレスという地味な服装をまとった。

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対照的に、男っぽいヘンリーは18歳の女性で、1837年に女王となるビクトリアの名前であり、65年にわたり君臨し名を残した。彼女は遠いいとこのアルバートと結婚して九人の子供をもうけた。 不幸にしてアルバートは1861年にチフスでなくなった。42歳だった。ビクトリア女王は大変哀しみ、残りの人生を喪に伏した。パーティーに出ようとせず、ハイネックで長袖の、黒のロングドレスという地味な服装をまとった。

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