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日本語訳を! 8-(6)

お願いします。 (17) But just when he was sure he was a goner, Sinuhe was rescued by a tribe of nomads. The head of the tribe tells Sinuhe, "stay with me; I shall do you good." True to his word, the headsman made Sinuhe a wealthy and important man. But when Sinuhe grew old he began to miss his beloved homeland. Sinuhe wanted to be buried in Egypt. He wanted to build his tomb―his resting place for eternity―in his own country. Sinuhe writes to Senwosert, now king of Egypt; "Whatever God fated this flight―be gracious, and buring e home! Surely You will let me see the place where my heart still stays! What matters more than my being buried in the land where I was born?" King Senwosert answers, "Return to Egypt! And you will see the Residence where you grew up." (18) Back in Egypt, the king gave Sinuhe a home and food and fine linen. All his needs were taken care of: "A pyramid of stone was built for me...the masons who construct the pyramid measured out its foundations; the draughtsman drew in it; the overseer of sculptors carved in it." Sinuhe's tale, like Egypt itself, was in for a happy ending. Using "landing" as a metaphor for death―an appropriate word choice for a tale of journey―Sinuhe ends his story by saying, "I was in the favors of the king's giving, until the day of landing came." And now Egypt was in the favors of the king, too. It had traveled from monarchy to anarchy and back again.

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(17) しかし、正に彼が、死ぬと確信したとき、シヌヘは遊牧民の部族によって救われました。 部族の族長は、シヌヘに次の様に言います。「私の元にとどまりなさい; 私は、あなたに親切にしよう。」 彼のことば通り、族長は、シヌヘを裕福で重要な人物にしました。 しかし、シヌヘが年をとったとき、彼は愛する祖国を懐かしみ始めました。 シヌヘは、エジプトに埋葬されたいと思いました。彼は、彼自身の国に、彼の墓 ― 永遠の彼の休息所 ― を建てたいと思いました。 シヌヘは、今ではエジプトの王となったセンウォセルトに手紙を書きます; 「たとえ神がこの逃亡にいかなる運命を与えようとも ― 慈悲深くあらせたまえ、そして、我を故郷に返したまえ! 必ずや、陛下は、私に私の心がまだとどまる場所を見させてくれることでしょう! 私が生まれた土地に葬られることより重要なことがあるでしょうか?」センウォセルト王は答えます。「エジプトに戻れ! さすれば、そなたは、育った土地を目にすることであろう。」 (18) エジプトに戻ると、王はシヌヘに家と食物と素晴らしいリネンを与えました。 彼のすべての必要物は、面倒を見られました: 「石のピラミッドが、私のために建設されました ... ピラミッドを建設する石工は、その基礎を測量しました; 製図工は、それを図面にしました; 彫刻家の監督は、それに彫刻しました。」 シヌヘの物語は、エジプトそのものの様に、ハッピーエンドになりそうでした。死に対する比喩として「上陸」― 旅の物語にとって適切な言葉の選択でした ― と言う言葉を使って、シヌヘは、次の様に語って彼の物語を締めくくっています「上陸の日が訪れるまで、私は王様の寛大さの恵みに浴しました。」 そして、今や、エジプトもまたその王の恵みに浴していました。 それ(エジプト)は、君主制から無政府状態となり、再び君主制を取り戻す旅を終えたのでした。

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