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お願いします (22) In his fervor for the Aten, Akhenaten forgot Egypt. The city of Amarna was like the royal firstborn son who took all the attention. The rest of Egypt became the second son, ignored and neglected. Egyptians outside Amarna were paying taxes to build a city they would never see, dedicated to a god they did not want. (23) Egypt's foreign subjects fell one by one to outside conquerors. The Amarna letters flooded in with pleas for help. They fell on deaf ears. One poor prince wrote at least 64 times, "Why will you neglect our land?" (24) Akhenaten had inherited an empire but left a country in decline. After his death the new capital was abandoned. The kings who followed Akhenaten demolished his temples and erased his name. Once Amarna had been stripped of stone it was forgotten and left to crumble. The sun had set on he Amarna Period.

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(22) アテン神を熱心に崇拝するあまり、アクエンアテンは、エジプトを忘れました。 アマルナの都は、すべての注目を集める王家の長男のようでした。 エジプトの他の土地は、2人目の息子になり、無視されて、気にかけてもらえなくなりました。アマルナ以外の土地に住むエジプト人は、彼らが決して見ることもない都を造るために税を払い、彼らが望みもしない神を祭らされていました。 (23) エジプトの外国の支配地域は、一つまた一つと国外の征服者に奪われてゆきました。 アマルナ書簡は、助けを求める訴えであふれています。訴えは聞き届けられませんでした。一人の哀れな王子は、少なくとも64回書簡を送っています「なぜ、あなたは我々の土地を見捨てるのですか?」と。 (24) アクエンアテンは、帝国を受け継ぎましたが、国を衰退させるにまかせました。 彼の死後、その新しい都は、捨てられました。 アクエンアテンの後の王たちは、彼の神殿を破壊して、彼の名前を消し去りました。 ひとたびアマルナが権力を失うと、そこは忘れられて、崩壊するに任せられました。 アマルナ時代の太陽は沈みました。

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