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日本語訳を! 1-(7)

お願いします。  Despite Harkhuf's major expeditions and all the riches he and other traders brought back to Egypt―from Nubia with all its gold, Sinai with all its turquoise, and Punt with all its incense―it was this dancing pygmy that captured the heart of Pepi II. And the letter written by the boy-king remained so important to Harkhuf that at he end of his days he chose to record it on his tomb. If you were the supreme ruler of Egypt 4,000 years ago, what kinds of letters would you write? What songs would you sing to the Nile? Think about it while your servants fan you with ostrich feathers. But you might want to be careful how you order your teachers around.

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ハルクハフの大きな探検と彼と他の交易商達が、エジプトに持ち帰ったすべての富-ヌビアの黄金、シナイ半島のトルコ石、プントの香料-にもかかわらず、ペピ2世の心を捕えたのは、この踊るピグミーでした。 そして、少年王によって書かれた手紙は、ハルクハフにとっていつまでもとても重要だったので、人生の終わりに、彼は、自分の墓にそれを記すことを選んだのでした。【at he end→at the end?】あなたが、4,000年前にエジプトの最高の統治者であったならば、あなたはどんな種類の手紙を書くでしょうか? あなたは、ナイル川にどんな歌を歌うでしょうか? あなたの召使たちが、あなたをダチョウの羽であおぐ間に、それについて考えてごらんなさい。 しかし、あなたは、どのように先生にいちいち指図するかについては注意した方がよいかもしれません。 <参考> プント国 http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%83%97%E3%83%B3%E3%83%88%E5%9B%BD

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