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日本語訳を! 1-(7)

お願いします。  Despite Harkhuf's major expeditions and all the riches he and other traders brought back to Egypt―from Nubia with all its gold, Sinai with all its turquoise, and Punt with all its incense―it was this dancing pygmy that captured the heart of Pepi II. And the letter written by the boy-king remained so important to Harkhuf that at he end of his days he chose to record it on his tomb. If you were the supreme ruler of Egypt 4,000 years ago, what kinds of letters would you write? What songs would you sing to the Nile? Think about it while your servants fan you with ostrich feathers. But you might want to be careful how you order your teachers around.

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ハルクハフの大きな探検と彼と他の交易商達が、エジプトに持ち帰ったすべての富-ヌビアの黄金、シナイ半島のトルコ石、プントの香料-にもかかわらず、ペピ2世の心を捕えたのは、この踊るピグミーでした。 そして、少年王によって書かれた手紙は、ハルクハフにとっていつまでもとても重要だったので、人生の終わりに、彼は、自分の墓にそれを記すことを選んだのでした。【at he end→at the end?】あなたが、4,000年前にエジプトの最高の統治者であったならば、あなたはどんな種類の手紙を書くでしょうか? あなたは、ナイル川にどんな歌を歌うでしょうか? あなたの召使たちが、あなたをダチョウの羽であおぐ間に、それについて考えてごらんなさい。 しかし、あなたは、どのように先生にいちいち指図するかについては注意した方がよいかもしれません。 <参考> プント国 http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%83%97%E3%83%B3%E3%83%88%E5%9B%BD

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    お願いします。  Without the Nile you wouldn't have much of a kingdom to rule. Strutting might seem a bit silly. Egypt would be home to nothing more than a few wandering bands of nomads passing through the red land, dusty and dragging from the relentless heat, in search of the rare oasis. The Nile, however, the glorious Nile, brought a narrow band of life to Egypt. It carried rich, black dirt and spread it over the floodplains, creating fields for the Egyptians to plant their seeds. The Egyptians called it khemet―the black land. The change from red land to black land was so abrupt you could straddle the border, standing with one foot in red earth and the other in black.  The ancient Egyptians knew tha without the Great River they would have no villages, no fields of wheat, and no cattle. To them the water was sacred. They believed it flowed from paradise and could heal the sick. They wrote songs to the Nike―praising its life-giving force. The Hymn to the Nile began "Hail to thee O, Nile!" and praised the Great River for coming "to give life to Egypt." It may seem as if the ancients got carried away with their praise when they sang, "If you cease your toil and your work, then all that exists is in anguish." But if the Nile did "cease its toil," the people would starve. Maybe they weren't so carried away after all.

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  • 日本語訳を! 1-(1)

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