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お願いします (20) Akhenaten's new capital was lined with office building after office building: the palace, the House of the Correspondence of Pharaoh, where the Amarna Letters were found; the police station, with a full staff of policemen who rode around in chariots; and a university, where priests of the new order were educated. Now that the old myths were no longer taught, Akhenaten had to write new ones. The Great Hymn to the Aten shows us Akhenaten's poetic side. He writes that even "Birds fly up to their nests, their wings extended in praise of your ka [spirit]." The hymn teaches that the Aten created not just Egypt, but the entire world and everything in it:  You create the earth as you wish, when you were by yourself,...all beings on land, who fare upon their feet, and all beings in the air, who fly with their wings. The lands of Khor [Syro-Palestine] and Kush [Nubia] and the land of Egypt.... Tongues are separate in speech, and their characters as well; their skins are different, for you differentiate the foreigners. The hymn also makes it clear to the priests that they will not be the ones who represent the Aten on Earth, "There is no other who knows you except for your son [Akhenaten], for you have apprised him of your designs and your power." (21) Then Akhenaten took a fatal step. He denied Egyptians the afterlife. He doomed his new religion to failure. He gad rankled the people by taking away the old gods and the old traditions, and now he took away their hopes for eternal life.

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(20) アクエンアテンの新しい都は、官庁の建物がたくさん並んでいました: 宮殿、アマルナ書簡が見つかったファラオの通信の館; 二輪戦車で走り回る大勢の警官がいる警察署; そして、新しい階級の神官が教育を受ける大学がありました。今では古い神話がもはや教えられなくなったので、アクエンアテンは、新しい神話を書かなければなりませんでした。 アテンに捧げられた素晴らしい讃美歌は、我々にアクエンアテンの詩的な側面を見せてくれます。 「そなたのカア[霊魂]を誉めたたえてその翼を広げ、鳥たちさえも彼らの巣に飛び立つ。」と、彼は書いています。 讃美歌の教えによれば、アテン神は、エジプトばかりでなく、全世界とそこに生きる全てをお造りになったようです: あなたが一人でおられた時、あなたは、望むままに、地球をお造りにられた ... 地上にあるものは全て、その足で立ち、空にあるものは全て、その翼で飛ぶ。 コー[シロ-パレスチナ]とクシュ[ヌビア]の地とエジプトの地 .... 用いられる言語は別れ、その文字もまた同様なり;その肌の色も異なる、なぜならば、あなたが外国人を区別するからである。 賛美歌は、また、神官たちに彼らが地上でアテン神の代わりをする者ではない事を明らかにします、「あなたの息子[アクエンアテン]以外にあなたを知る者はない、なぜならば、あなたは彼にあなたの意図とあなたの力を知らせたからである。」 (21) それから、アクエンアテンは、命取りとなる一歩を歩みました。 彼は、エジプト人に来世を否定したのです。 彼は、彼の新しい宗教を失敗へと運命づけました。 彼は、古い神々と古い伝統を人々から奪って人々を苦しめました、そして、今度は、彼は永遠の命に対する彼らの望みを奪ったのでした。

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