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日本語訳を!(15)

お願いします (1) Imagine your father owned the richest and most powerful country in the world. Not just rain it, owned it. It wasn't only the land that belonged to him, but also all the gold and grain in the treasury. He owned every brick in every building and every cow on every farm. The people and all that they owned were his as well. All of it one day would be passed down―but not to you, to your older brother. Since birth, he had been in training for the job while you watched from the sidelines. Tutors and generals and government overseers prepared your older brother for the day when he would take the reins. Your father, the king, and your mother, the queen, focused their attentions on your older brother, fussing over his every move, while you went unnoticed. That was life for Amenhotep IV, the second son of Amenhotep III. (2) Getting the lion's share of attention wasn't all good. You both learned to read and write, but when your brother was struggling with the language of diplomats, you could swish your damp brush in the ink cake and practice your penmanship on sayings like, "Report a thing observed, not heard." You both learned to drive a chariot, but while your brother had to practice looking regal, you could flush grouse out of the papyrus patch. The vizier grilled him on how each department in the government worked while you grilled the grouse. (3) When Amenhotep IV was a young boy, Egypt was...well, simply fabulous. The mid-1300s BCE was the golden age―literally. Gold flowed in from the Nubian mines so steadily that envious foreign leaders peevishly observed, "in my brother's country gold is as plentiful as dirt."

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(1) あなたの父親が、世界で最も豊かで最も強大な国を所有していたと想像してください。 その国を単に支配するだけでなく、それを所有していたと想像して下さい。 それは、彼が所有している土地だけでなく、宝物庫の中のすべての金と穀物もということです。 彼は、すべての建物の全てのレンガ、全ての農場のすべての牛を所有していました。 人民と人民が所有する全てのものもまた彼のものでした。それの全てが、ある日、次の世代へと譲り渡されるでしょう ― しかし、あなたにではなく、あなたの兄に譲渡されるのです。 生まれた時から、彼はその仕事を引き継ぐための訓練を受けてきました、他方、あなたは、第3者の立場から見ていました。 家庭教師、将軍、政府の監督官は、あなたの兄に彼が治世を引き継ぐ日の準備をさせました。国王であるあなたの父親と女王であるあなたの母親は、あなたの兄に注意を集中し、彼のあらゆる動きに大騒ぎしました、他方、あなたは、注意を払われないままでした。 それが、アメンホテップ3世の2人目の息子アメンホテップ4世にとっての人生でした。 (2) 最も多くの注目を集めると言うことは、必ずしも良いことばかりではありませんでした。あなた達二人は、読み書きを学びました、しかし、あなたの兄が、外交官の言葉で苦労している時、あなたは、墨で湿った筆を振り回し「耳にしたことではなく、目にしたことを報告せよ」と言った様な格言を使って習字の練習をすることが出来ました。あなた達二人は、二輪戦車の操縦を学びました、しかし、あなたの兄が、王らしく堂々と見える練習をしなければならないのに比べて、あなたは、ライチョウをパピルスの群生地から追い立てることができました。 あなたが、ライチョウを直火で焼いている間、主席大臣は、政府の各々の部門がどのように機能するかについて、あなたの兄を厳しく質問攻めにしていました。 (3) アメンホテップ4世が、幼い少年の頃、エジプトは ... そうですね、とにかく素晴らしい状況でした。紀元前1300年代の中頃は、文字通り ― 黄金時代でした。 金が、ヌビアの鉱山から確実に流入したので、ねたみを抱く外国の為政者は、「我が兄弟の国では、金は塵芥と同じくらい豊富にある。」と、不機嫌に述べました。

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