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お願いします (13) Throughout history, alliances have been made through marriage. Amenhotep III married several foreign princesses in the name of diplomacy. But the Amarna Letters show that Amenhotep III didn't consider these diplomatic unions a give-and-take situation. When the king of Babylon asked for an Egyptian princess, Amenhotep III flat out refused, even though he gad taken the king of Babylon's sister as a bride. The angry king of Babylon wrote, "When I wrote to you about marrying your daughter you wrote to me saying ‘From time immemorial no daughter of the king of Egypt has been given in marriage to anyone.’Why do you say this? You are the king and you may do as you please. If you were to give a daughter, who would say anything about it?" But Amenhotep III wasn't budging. Egypt did not give away princesses. (14) The marriages allied rulers, not countries. If either husband or father-in-law should die, negotiations started all over again. This letter from the King of Hatti to Amenhotep III's son, after Amenhotep III died, shows that things didn't always continue as they had in the past: "your father never neglected... the wishes I expressed, but granted me everything. Why have you... refused to send me... gifts of friendship, I wish good friendship to exist between you and md." (15) Some of the letters were sent to people close to the king and pleaded for help. This letter from the king of Mittani to Queen Tiy shows how influential she must have been, not only during her husband's reign, but also during her son's:  You are the one who knows that I have always felt friendship for... your husband... but you have not sent me yet the gift of homage... your husband, has ordered be sent to me. I have asked... your husband for massive gold statues.... But your son has goldplated statues of wood. As gold is like dust in the country of your son, why... [hasn't] your son... given them to me?

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(13) 歴史を通して、同盟は結婚を通じてなされました。 アメンホテップ3世は、外交の名において数人の外国の王女と結婚しました。 しかし、アマルナ書簡は、アメンホテップ3世がこれらの外交的な結婚を持ちつ持たれつの状況とは考えなかったことを示しています。 バビロンの王がエジプトの王女を所望した時、たとえ彼が花嫁としてバビロンの王の妹を娶っていたとしても、アメンホテップ3世ははっきりと拒絶しました。バビロンの怒った王は書きました。「余が、(エジプト国王)陛下の娘御との結婚について陛下に書簡を送りし時、陛下は返書で次の如く言われた『太古から、エジプト国王の娘は、結婚の形で誰にも与えられたことがない。』なぜ、陛下はこう言われるのか? 陛下は国王であり、好み通りのことを行えるのです。 陛下が娘を与えるとしても、誰がそれについて意見を言うでしょう?」しかし、アメンホテップ3世は譲歩しませんでした。 エジプトは、王女を嫁がせることはありませんでした。 (14) 結婚は、国家ではなく、統治者を同盟させました。 夫や義理の父が死ねば、交渉ははじめからもう一度繰り返されました。 アメンホテップ3世が死んだあとの、ヒッタイトの国王からのアメンホテップ3世の息子への次の手紙は、事態が従来通りには必ずしも続かなかったことを示しています:「陛下のお父上は、余の表明する願いを決して無視されることはなく、余にすべてをお与えになった。何故、陛下は余に友好の贈り物を送ることを拒否されたのか、余は、陛下と余の間に良き友好が存在することを望む。」 (15) 手紙の中には、王の側近の人々に送られて、援助を懇願したものもありました。 ミタンニ国王からティイ女王に送られたこの書簡は、女王が夫君の統治の期間ばかりでなく、彼女の息子の統治の期間においても、どれほど女王の影響力が大きかったかを示しています: (女王)陛下は、余が陛下の夫君に対して友情を常に感じてきたことを知る人なり ... しかるに、陛下の夫君が余に送るように命じていた「敬意の贈り物」を陛下は、まだ、余に送られてはおりません。余は、陛下の夫君に巨大な黄金の像を所望せり ... しかるに、陛下のご子息は、木像に金メッキを施せリ。陛下のご子息の国においては、黄金は、塵芥のごとし、何故、陛下のご子息は、黄金の像を余に与えざりしか?

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  • 日本語訳を!(13)

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  • 日本語訳を!

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  • 日本語訳を!(15)

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  • 日本語訳で困っています。

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  • 日本語訳を!

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  • 日本語訳を!

    お願いします (14) About the time that Amenhotep IV took the throne, he also took a wife―Nefertiti, which means "The Beautiful Woman Has Come." His parents' unusually close relationship could have been the model that led Amehotep IV to break tradition again and share his power with "the Foremost Wife of the King, whom he loves, the Mistress of the Two Lands,... Nefertiti, living and young, forever and ever." Amenhotep IV's devotion to Nefertiti was displayed on temple walls. Traditional paintings of the king as a muscled, fierce warrior were replaced with paintings of the king as a loving, doting famiky man―Amenhotep kissing his wife, Amenhotep with a daughter on his knee, Amenhotep surrounded by his family. (15) Soon Amenhotep IV found another obsession. He latched onto an obscure sun god that his father had fancied, Aten, which means "the disk." In the fifth year of Amenhotep IV's reign, he changed his name to Akhenaten which means "Spirit of the Sun Disk." The name change was not as shocking as what followed. Akhenaten announced that the gods Egyptians had been worshiping for thousands of years no longer existed. The Aten was the one and only. Akhenaten cut off funds to the temples. There would be no more tributes to these false gods, no more temples built in Thebes, no more revenues funneled into the priesthood. Those riches woukd now go directly to the Aten and (perhaps rather shrewdly) to his representative on Earth, the king himself―Akhenaten. (16) The Aten needed his own city, a new capital built on new ground. Akhenaten sailed the Nile in search of the right spot to build the city. On the east bank of the Nike, halfway between Memphis and Thebes, a semicircle of cliffs rose above an arc of windswept desert. It was there, on an isolated strip of land, that Akhenaten built the city we know as Amarna.

  • 日本語訳を! 7-(5)

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