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日本語訳で困っています。

うまく日本語訳ができません。だれか教えてください。お願いします。 (1)what you thought was normal in your own culture. (2)the new standard of normality you obtained abroad. (3)the notes you took while you studied abroad. (4)what you thought was strange in the past.

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(1)what you thought was normal in your own culture.   要するに君の考えなんてのは、お国柄を反映しているに過ぎないのだよ。 (2)the new standard of normality you obtained abroad.   君が海外で得てきたと思しきまともな新規格やね。 (3)the notes you took while you studied abroad.   海外留学中に書き溜めたメモ    (4)what you thought was strange in the past.   昔は君の考えなどに誰も耳を貸さなかったよなあ。

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