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日本語訳お願いします。

The best way of approaching philosophy is to ask a few philosophical question: How was the world created?Is there any will or meaning behind what happens? Is there a life after death?How can we answer these questions?And most important,how ought we to live?People have been asking questions throughout the ages.We know of no culture which has not concerned itself with what man is and where the world came from. Basically there are not many philosophical questions to ask.We have already asked some of the most important ones.But history presents us with many different answers to each question.So it is easier to ask philosophical questions than to answer them. Today as well each individual has to discover his own answer to these same questions.You cannot find out whether there is a God or whether there is life after death by looking in an encyclopedia.Nor does the encyclopedia tell us how we ought to live.However,reading what other people have believed can help us formulate our own view of life. Philosopheres’ search for the truth resembles a detective story.Some think Andersen was the murderer,others think it was Nielsen or Jensen.The police are sometimes able to solve a real crime.But it is equally possible that they never get to the bottom of it,although there is a solution somewhere.So even if it is difficult to answer a question,there may be one―and only one―right answer.Either there is a kind of existence after death―or there is not. A lot of age-old enigmas have now been explained by science.What the dark side of the moon looks like was once shrouded in mystery.It was not the kind of thing that could be solved by discussion;it was left to the imagination of the individual.But today we know exactly what the dark side of the moon looks like,and no one can `believe` any longer in the Man in the Moon,or that the moon is made of green cheese. A Greek philosopher who lived more than two thousand years ago believed that philosophy had its origin in man’s sense of wonder.Man thought it was so astonishing to be alive that philosophical questions arose of their own accord.

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  • 回答No.2
  • Nakay702
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(続き) >Philosophers’ search for the truth resembles a detective story. Some think Andersen was the murderer, others think it was Nielsen or Jensen. The police are sometimes able to solve a real crime. But it is equally possible that they never get to the bottom of it, although there is a solution somewhere. So even if it is difficult to answer a question, there may be one― and only one― right answer. Either there is a kind of existence after death― or there is not. ⇒哲学者による真実の探求は、探偵物語の謎解きに似ている。アンデルセンが殺人犯だと思う人もいれば、ニールセンかジェンセンだと思う人もいる。警察が、時々、実際の犯罪を解決することができる。しかし、どこかに解決策があるにもかかわらず、決して真相を突き止めるまでいけない可能性も同程度にある。したがって、答えるのが難しい質問の場合でも、1つ ― そう、1つだけ ― 正解が存在する可能性がある。死後にはある種の存在可能性があるとも言えるし ― 無いとも言える。 >A lot of age-old enigmas have now been explained by science. What the dark side of the moon looks like was once shrouded in mystery. It was not the kind of thing that could be solved by discussion; it was left to the imagination of the individual. But today we know exactly what the dark side of the moon looks like, and no one can `believe` any longer in the Man in the Moon, or that the moon is made of green cheese. ⇒古くからの謎の多くが、今は科学によって説明されている。月の暗い面は、かつては謎に包まれていた。それは議論で解決できるものではなかったので、個人の想像に任されていた。しかし、今日、我々は月の暗い面がどう見えるのかを正確に知っており、もはや、お月さんに人間がいるとか、月が緑のチーズでできているなどと、誰も「信じる」ことはできない。 >A Greek philosopher who lived more than two thousand years ago believed that philosophy had its origin in man’s sense of wonder. Man thought it was so astonishing to be alive that philosophical questions arose of their own accord. ⇒2000年以上前に生きていたギリシャの哲学者は、哲学は人間が不思議だと感じることに由来する、と信じていた。生きていること(自体)が驚きに満ちているので、哲学的な疑問も自発的に立ち上がってくる(はずである)と人は考えたのである。

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  • 回答No.1
  • Nakay702
  • ベストアンサー率81% (8896/10943)

以下のとおりお答えします。原文を数行ごとに区切って、原文・訳文を併記します。 >The best way of approaching philosophy is to ask a few philosophical question: How was the world created? Is there any will or meaning behind what happens? Is there a life after death? How can we answer these questions? And most important, how ought we to live? People have been asking questions throughout the ages. We know of no culture which has not concerned itself with what man is and where the world came from. ⇒哲学に近づく最善の方法は、若干の哲学的な質問をすることです。すなわち、世界はどのように創造されたか? 起こることの背後には何らかの意志や意味があるか? 死後の人生というものはあるか? これらの質問に我々はどう答えることができるか? そして、最も重要なこととして、我々はどのように生きるべきか? 人々はそれぞれの年齢を通じて質問してきた。我々は、人とは何か、そして世界はどこから来たか、と問わない文化など存在しないことを知っている。 >Basically there are not many philosophical questions to ask. We have already asked some of the most important ones. But history presents us with many different answers to each question. So it is easier to ask philosophical questions than to answer them. ⇒基本的に尋ねるべき哲学的な質問はあまり多くはない。我々は既にいくつかの最も重要なものを尋ねた。しかし、歴史は我々に各質問に対する多くの異なる答えを提示している。だから、哲学的な質問は、答えるより尋ねる方が簡単である。 >Today as well each individual has to discover his own answer to these same questions. You cannot find out whether there is a God or whether there is life after death by looking in an encyclopedia. Nor does the encyclopedia tell us how we ought to live. However, reading what other people have believed can help us formulate our own view of life. ⇒今日では、各人がこの種の質問に対する自分字親の答えを発見しなければならない。百科事典を見ることで、神は存在するか、死後の人生があるか、などを知ることはできない。また、百科事典はどのように生きるべきかを我々に教えてくれない。ただし、他人が信じていることを読むのは、我々自身の人生観を暖めるのに役立てることはできる。 *長いので、以下は次便にします。 ところで、10日ほど前の「日本語訳お願いします。2018-08-26 21:11:11質問No.9531215」の訳はいかがでしたか? 疑問点・不明点などがありましたら、コメントしてください。なければ、何らかのケリをつけていただけると嬉しいです。

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