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お願いします (14) Crassus was furious. He armed the men again. Then he divided 500 of the soldiers into 50 groups of 10. In each group, the men drew straws, and one man was chosen. Plutarch says that Crassus ordered the death of these fifty men, that they be executed“with a variety of appalling and terrible methods, performed before the eyes of the whole army, gathered to watch.”Crassus finally led Rome to victory, but only after a long, fierce struggle. Most of the rebels were killed. According to Plutarch, Spartacus refused to give up and fought savagely, even after the last of his men had deserted him. In the end, he died a soldier's death―with his sword in his hand. (15) The Romans crucified 6,000 rebels and left hanging on wooden crosses all along the Appian Way―a road that led to Rome. Their rotting bodies served as a horrible warning to rebellious slaves. (16) Although Rome was cruel to its slaves, not all of them suffered as terribly as the gladiators and mine workers did. Many captured people were skilled craftsmen who were allowed to continue their work as potters, artists, or metal workers. Those who worked in the homes of wealthy aristocrats were also treated fairly well―compared to less fortunate slaves. Household slaves were usually well fed and clothed. And their jobs were much safer and more pleasant. They worked as nannies, cooks, and seamstresses. Welleducated Greek slaves could become household secretaries or tutors for their masters' children. (17) Although slaves might become friendly with the master and his family, they still had to take orders. And if they committed crimes, they could be tortured, burned alive, crucified, or sent to fight wild beasts in the arena while the audience watched and cheered. The upper classes never suffered these violent punishments. Aristocratic criminals were killed with the sword―a quicker, less agonizing way to die.

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(14) クラッススは激怒しました。彼は、再び部下を武装させました。それから、彼は、兵士500人を10人からなる50のグループに分けました。各々のグループ内で、部下たちは、くじを引きました、そして、1人の男が、選ばれました。プルタークは、次の様に語ります、クラッススは、これらの50人の男に死ぬことを命じた、そして、彼らは「見物に集められた全軍の目の前で行われた様々なぞっとするような恐ろしい方法で」処刑された。クラッススは、ローマを勝利にようやく導きました、しかし、長い、激しい闘いの後にすぎませんでした。大部分の反乱者が、死にました。プルタークによると、彼の部下の最後に残った者たちが、彼を見捨てた後でさえ、スパルタクスは、降参することを拒否して、勇猛に戦いました。結局、彼は、手に剣を持ったまま ― つわものらしい死を遂げました。 (15) ローマ人は、6,000人の反乱者を磔にし、ローマに通じる道である ― アッピア街道に沿って、木の十字架に吊るして放置しました。彼らの腐りかけた死体は、反抗的な奴隷への恐ろしい見せしめとして用いられました。 (16) ローマは、その奴隷に残酷でしたが、彼ら全員が、闘士や鉱山労働者が、苦しんだほど、ものすごく苦しむというわけではありませんでした。多くの捕らえられた人々は、陶芸家、美術家、金属加工者として彼らの仕事を続けることを許された熟練した職人でした。裕福な貴族の家庭で働いた人々も、また、それほど幸運でない奴隷と比較して、かなり良い扱いを受けました。家庭用の奴隷は、通常、十分に食料や衣服を与えられました。そして、彼らの仕事は、ずっとより安全で、より楽しいものでした。彼らは、乳母、料理人、お針子として働きました。教養があるギリシアの奴隷は、家庭秘書や彼らの主人の子供たちのための家庭教師になることができました。 (17) 奴隷が、主人やその家族と親しくなる場合はありましたが、彼らは、やはり、命令を受けなければなりませんでした。そして、犯罪を犯せば、拷問されたり、火あぶりにされたり、磔にされたり、観衆が見物して喝采する中、アリーナで野獣と闘わせられに行かせられる可能性がありました。上流階級は、こうしたひどい罰を受けることは決してありませんでした。貴族の犯罪者は、剣で殺されました ― より迅速で、あまりつらくない殺され方でした。

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