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Thus in the decisive Sector II the Bulgarians were able to secure a substantial numerical superiority during the initial phase of the assault:At 5:30 a Bulgarian observation balloon pulled by an automobile ascended to the sky to direct the planned barrage. Exactly an hour later Colonel Angelov gave the order for the preliminary artillery bombardment to begin. The cannon concentrated their fire on the forts and obstacles between them, and at 7:40 am the observation post at Daidur reported that groups of Romanian soldiers were leaving forts 5 and 6, making their way through the communication trenches leading to the rear.

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>Thus in the decisive Sector II the Bulgarians were able to secure a substantial numerical superiority during the initial phase of the assault:At 5:30 a Bulgarian observation balloon pulled by an automobile ascended to the sky to direct the planned barrage. Exactly an hour later Colonel Angelov gave the order for the preliminary artillery bombardment to begin. ⇒かくして、第II要塞区画では明確な結果が出て、ブルガリア軍は猛攻撃の初期段階の間にかなりの数的優越を確保することができた。5時30分に、計画した集中砲火の方向づけのため自動車に引かせたブルガリア軍の観測気球が空へ上昇した。ちょうど1時間後、アンジェロフ大佐は、予備的な大砲砲撃を始めるよう命令を出した。 >The cannon concentrated their fire on the forts and obstacles between them, and at 7:40 am the observation post at Daidur reported that groups of Romanian soldiers were leaving forts 5 and 6, making their way through the communication trenches leading to the rear. ⇒大砲の砲火は砦や砦間の障害に集中したので、7時40分、ダイドゥルの監視所からの報告によると、ルーマニア軍兵士の数グループが、後衛に通じる連絡塹壕を通って5番、6番砦を離れていったという。

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おおざっぱに訳してみました。 私の英語力は大学受験レベルです。ご了承ください。 -------- こうして、結果を左右するSector IIにおいて、ブルガリア人は攻撃の最初の段階のうちにしっかりした数的な優越を確保することができた。 攻撃の最初の段階では、5時半に自動車によって引っ張られたブルガリアの観測気球が計画された弾幕を指示するために空に昇った。 ちょうど一時間後、Colonel Angelovは予備の大砲砲撃を開始するよう命令した。 大砲はそれらの砲火を要塞とかれらの間にある障害物に集中させ、午前7時40分にDaidurの観測点は、ルーマニアの軍人が要塞5と6を退去していて、かれらは後方部隊に導く通信トレンチの間を進んでいたと報告した。 --------

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