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The Germans secured the appointment of Lieutenant-General Erich Weber as an advisor to the Ottoman GHQ and at the end of August 1914, Vice-Admiral Guido von Usedom, several specialists and 500 men were sent to reinforce the forts on the Dardanelles and Bosphorus. In September, Usedom was made Inspector-General of Coast Defences and Mines and Vice-Admiral Johannes Merten relieved Weber at Chanak with a marine detachment to operate the modern guns. By mid-September, the German advisers reported that the guns in the Narrows had been refurbished and were serviceable. By October, most of the guns in the main batteries had German crews, operating as training units but able to man the guns in an emergency. Plans were made to build more defensive works in the Intermediate Zone and to bring in mobile howitzers and quick-firers dismounted from older Ottoman ships. Several heavy howitzers arrived in October but the poor standard of training of the Ottoman gunners, obsolete armaments and the chronic ammunition shortage, which Usedom reported was sufficient only to defend against one serious attack, led him to base the defence of the straits on minefields. Three more lines of mines had been laid before Usedom arrived and another 145 mines were searched out, serviced and laid in early November. Cover of the minefields was increased with small quick-firers and four more searchlights. by March 1915, there were ten lines of mines and 12 searchlights. When the Ottoman Empire went to war on 29 October 1914, the defences of the Straits had been much improved but the Intermediate Defences were still inadequately organised and lacking in guns, searchlights and mines. On 3 November, the outer forts were bombarded by Allied ships, which galvanised the Ottoman defenders into reducing their obstructionism against the German advisers. The fortress commander, Jevad Pasha, wrote later that he had to improve the defences at all costs. The short bombardment had been extraordinarily successful, destroying the forts at Sedd el Bahr with two shots, that exploded the magazine and dismounted the guns. The Ottoman and German defenders concluded that the Outer Defences could be demolished by ships firing from beyond the range of the Ottoman reply. The forts were repaired but not reinforced and the main effort was directed to protecting the minefield and Inner Defences.

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>The Germans secured the appointment of Lieutenant-General Erich Weber as an advisor to the Ottoman GHQ and at the end of August 1914, Vice-Admiral Guido von Usedom, several specialists and 500 men were sent to reinforce the forts on the Dardanelles and Bosphorus. In September, Usedom was made Inspector-General of Coast Defences and Mines and Vice-Admiral Johannes Merten relieved Weber at Chanak with a marine detachment to operate the modern guns. By mid-September, the German advisers reported that the guns in the Narrows had been refurbished and were serviceable. ⇒ドイツ軍は、エーリッ・ウェーバー中将をオスマン軍GHQ(総本部)の顧問として任命し、1914年8月末、ギド・フォン・ウーゼドム副提督、数人の専門家、および500人の兵士らにダーダネルスとボスポラスの砦を強化させるために派遣された。9月、ウーゼドムは沿岸防衛施設および機雷類の総検査官に任命され、ヨハネス・メルテン副提督は、現代的な大砲を操作するために、海兵隊の分遣隊とチャナックのウェーバーを出向させた。9月中旬ごろ、ドイツ軍の顧問団は狭部海峡の銃砲が一新されて使用可能になったと報告した。 >By October, most of the guns in the main batteries had German crews, operating as training units but able to man the guns in an emergency. Plans were made to build more defensive works in the Intermediate Zone and to bring in mobile howitzers and quick-firers dismounted from older Ottoman ships. Several heavy howitzers arrived in October but the poor standard of training of the Ottoman gunners, obsolete armaments and the chronic ammunition shortage, which Usedom reported was sufficient only to defend against one serious attack, led him to base the defence of the straits on minefields. ⇒10月までには、緊急時に銃砲を操作することができるように主要砲列のほとんどの銃砲にはドイツ軍の乗組員がついており、訓練部隊として操作していた。「中間領域」でより多くの防御作業を行ったり、古いオスマン軍の船舶から降ろされた移動式の榴弾砲と速射砲を持ち込んだりする計画が立てられた。10月に重榴弾砲が数門到着したが、オスマン軍の砲手の訓練基準が不十分で、武器は古く、慢性的な弾薬不足があったため、ウーゼドム報告によれば1回の深刻な攻撃を防御するだけでやっとという状況だったため、海峡の防衛用に地雷原を設置するに至ったという。 >Three more lines of mines had been laid before Usedom arrived and another 145 mines were searched out, serviced and laid in early November. Cover of the minefields was increased with small quick-firers and four more searchlights. by March 1915, there were ten lines of mines and 12 searchlights. When the Ottoman Empire went to war on 29 October 1914, the defences of the Straits had been much improved but the Intermediate Defences were still inadequately organised and lacking in guns, searchlights and mines. ⇒ウーゼドムが到着する前に、さらに3列の地雷が敷設され、11月初旬に別の145個の地雷が探索、整備、敷設された。地雷原の援護として、小さな速射砲と4つのサーチライトが増補された。1915年3月までに10列の地雷と12本のサーチライトが揃った。オスマン帝国が1914年10月29日に戦争に出陣したとき、海峡の防御は大幅に改善されたが、中間帯の防衛はまだ編成が不十分で、銃砲、サーチライト、地雷が不足していた。 >On 3 November, the outer forts were bombarded by Allied ships, which galvanised the Ottoman defenders into reducing their obstructionism against the German advisers. The fortress commander, Jevad Pasha, wrote later that he had to improve the defences at all costs. The short bombardment had been extraordinarily successful, destroying the forts at Sedd el Bahr with two shots, that exploded the magazine and dismounted the guns. The Ottoman and German defenders concluded that the Outer Defences could be demolished by ships firing from beyond the range of the Ottoman reply. The forts were repaired but not reinforced and the main effort was directed to protecting the minefield and Inner Defences. ⇒11月3日、外環砦は連合国軍の艦船によって砲撃されたので、オスマン軍の防衛隊がドイツ軍の顧問に対する妨害を減らすようになった。要塞の司令官であるジェバド・パシャは、後日、何とかして防御を改善しなければならない、と書いた。短時間の砲撃は大いに成功し、セド・エル・バールの砦を2発で破壊した。これによって武器庫が爆発し、大砲が砲座から外れた。オスマン軍とドイツ軍の防衛隊は、オスマン軍の応報(反撃)の射程を超えて発砲する船艦によって外環防衛が破壊される可能性があると結論づけた。砦は修理されが、補強されてはおらず、主な取り組みは地雷原と内側防衛の保護に向けられた。

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