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The forts were not linked and could only communicate by telephone and telegraph, the wires for which were not buried. Smaller fortifications and trench lines in the gaps between the forts, to link and protect them had been planned by Brialmont but had not been built by 1914. The fortress troops were not at full strength in 1914 and many men were drawn from local guard units, who had received minimal training, due to the reorganisation of the Belgian army, which had begun in 1911 and which was not due to be complete until 1926. The forts also had c. 30,000 soldiers of the 3rd Division to defend the gaps between forts, c. 6,000 fortress troops and members of the paramilitary Garde Civique, equipped with rifles and machine-guns. The garrison of c. 40,000 men and 400 guns, was insufficient to man the forts and field fortifications. In early August 1914, the garrison commander was unsure of the forces which he would have at his disposal, since until 6 August, it was possible that all of the Belgian army would advance towards the Meuse.

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要塞は互いに連携しておらず電話と電信で通信するだけだった。無線はまだ装備されていなかった。より小さな陣地や塹壕線を要塞の間に設け、連携して防護することがブリアルモンドによって計画されていたが、1914年までその建設が行われなかった。要塞部隊は1914年時点で完全充足しておらず、ほとんどが地方の国民軍部隊から引き抜かれてきており、最小限の訓練だけしか受けていなかった。ベルギー軍は改革途上にあり、それは1911年に始められたところであり、1926年までは完成しなかったためである。 要塞は第3師団の兵士およそ30,000名が要塞間にあるゲーテを守備していた。また6,000名の要塞部隊と民兵が小銃や機関銃を装備していた。 40,000名の要塞兵と400丁の銃砲は、要塞や野戦陣地の要員としては不十分だった。 8月6日までは全ベルギー軍がミューズに向けて進撃できたので、1914年8月の早い段階では要塞部隊司令官は、要塞に必要な兵力についてはっきりしたことがわからなかった。

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