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Liège is situated at the confluence of the Meuse, which at the city flows through a deep ravine and the Ourthe, between the Ardennes to the south and Maastricht (in the Netherlands) and Flanders to the north and west. The city lies on the main rail lines from Germany to Brussels and Paris, which von Schlieffen and von Moltke planned to use in the invasion of France. Much industrial development had taken place in Liège and the vicinity, which presented an obstacle to an invading force. The main defences were in the Position fortifiée de Liège (Fortified Position of Liège), a ring of twelve forts 6–10-kilometre (3.7–6.2 mi) from the city, built in 1892 by Henri Alexis Brialmont, the leading fortress engineer of the nineteenth century. The forts were sited about 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) apart to be mutually supporting but had been designed for frontal, rather than all-round defence.

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>Liège is situated at the confluence of the Meuse, which at the city flows through a deep ravine and the Ourthe, between the Ardennes to the south and Maastricht (in the Netherlands) and Flanders to the north and west. The city lies on the main rail lines from Germany to Brussels and Paris, which von Schlieffen and von Moltke planned to use in the invasion of France. Much industrial development had taken place in Liège and the vicinity, which presented an obstacle to an invading force. ⇒リエージュは、ミューズ川とウルツ川の合流点に立地している。街中のミューズ川は深い峡谷を流れる。ウルツ川は、南側に(オランダの)アルデンヌとマーストリヒトを見て、北と西にフランドルを見てその間を流れる。リエージュ市は、ドイツからブリュッセルとパリへ通じる鉄道の本線沿いにあるので、フォン・シュリーフェンとフォン・モルトケは、それをフランスへの侵入で使う予定であった。多くの産業開発がリエージュと周辺で起こていたので、それが侵入する軍隊にとっては障害となっていた。 >The main defences were in the Position fortifiée de Liège (Fortified Position of Liège), a ring of twelve forts 6–10-kilometre (3.7–6.2 mi) from the city, built in 1892 by Henri Alexis Brialmont, the leading fortress engineer of the nineteenth century. The forts were sited about 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) apart to be mutually supporting but had been designed for frontal, rather than all-round defence. ⇒19世紀の指導的な要塞技師アンリ・アレクシス・ブリアルモンによって1892年に築かれた"fortifiée de Liège"(リエージュ強化陣地)、すなわち、都市から6–10キロ(3.7–6.2マイル)のところに環状に並ぶ12か所の砦に、主要防衛隊が駐屯していた。その砦は、相互に支援し合えるように、およそ4キロ(2.5マイル)間隔で位置取りされていたが、全面防御用としてよりもむしろ前線用に設計されていた。

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