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Around midday German troops broke through south-west of St. Quentin, reached the Battle Zone and by 14:30 were nearly 3 km (1.9 mi) south of Essigny. Gough kept in contact with the corps commanders by telephone until 15:00 then visited them in turn. At the III Corps Headquarters ("HQ"), he authorised a withdrawal behind the Crozat canal, at the XVIII Corps HQ he was briefed that the Battle Zone was intact and at the XIX Corps HQ found that the Forward Zone on each flank had been captured. Gough ordered that ground was to be held for as long as possible but that the left flank was to be withdrawn, to maintain touch with the VII Corps. The 50th Division was ordered forward as a reinforcement for the next day. On the VII Corps front, Ronssoy had been captured and the 39th Division was being brought forward; on the rest of the front, the 21st and 9th divisions were maintaining their positions and had preserved the link with V Corps of the Third Army in the Flesquières Salient to the north. The Fifth Army "Forward Zone", was the only area where the defences had been completed and had been captured. Most of the troops in the zone were taken prisoner by the Germans who moved up unseen in the fog; garrisons in the various keeps and redoubts had been surrounded. Many parties inflicted heavy losses on the Germans, despite attacks on their trenches with flame throwers. Some surrounded units surrendered once cut off, after running out of ammunition and having had many casualties; others fought to the last man. German A7V tank in Roye, Somme, 26 March 1918 In the Third Army area, German troops broke through during the morning, along the Cambrai–Bapaume road in the Boursies–Louverval area and through the weak defences of the 59th Division near Bullecourt. By the close of the day, the Germans had broken through the British Forward Zone and entered the Battle Zone on most of the attack front and had advanced through the Battle Zone, on the right flank of the Fifth Army, from Tergnier on the Oise river to Seraucourt-le-Grand. South-west of St. Quentin in the 36th Division area, the 9th Irish Fusiliers war diary record noted that there had been many casualties, three battalions of the Forward Zone had been lost and three battalions in the Battle Zone were reduced to 250 men each, leaving only the three reserve battalions relatively intact.

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>Around midday German troops broke through south-west of St. Quentin, reached the Battle Zone and by 14:30 were nearly 3 km (1.9 mi) south of Essigny. Gough kept in contact with the corps commanders by telephone until 15:00 then visited them in turn. At the III Corps Headquarters ("HQ"), he authorised a withdrawal behind the Crozat canal, at the XVIII Corps HQ he was briefed that the Battle Zone was intact and at the XIX Corps HQ found that the Forward Zone on each flank had been captured. ⇒正午頃、ドイツ軍がサン・ケンタンの南西を突破して戦闘地帯に達し、14時30分までにエシーニュから約3キロ南にあった。ゴフは15時まで電話で軍団指揮官と接触し、順番に彼らを訪問し、第III軍団「本部」ではクロザット運河背後への撤退を認め、第XVIII軍団「本部」では戦闘地帯が損なわれていないことを概略聞き、第XIX軍団司令部「本部」では、各側面の前方地帯が攻略されたことを知った。 >Gough ordered that ground was to be held for as long as possible but that the left flank was to be withdrawn, to maintain touch with the VII Corps. The 50th Division was ordered forward as a reinforcement for the next day. On the VII Corps front, Ronssoy had been captured and the 39th Division was being brought forward; on the rest of the front, the 21st and 9th divisions were maintaining their positions and had preserved the link with V Corps of the Third Army in the Flesquières Salient to the north. ⇒ゴフは、その地面をできるだけ長く保持するように指示したが、第VII軍団との接触を維持するために、左側面への退却を命じた。第50師団は、翌日の補強隊として前方移動を命じられた。第VII軍団の前線では、ロンソーが攻略され、第39師団が前方へ進んだ。前線の残り部分では、第21師団と第9師団がそれぞれの陣地を維持していて、北側のフレスキエール突出部に駐屯する第3方面軍の第V軍団との関係を保っていた。 >The Fifth Army "Forward Zone", was the only area where the defences had been completed and had been captured. Most of the troops in the zone were taken prisoner by the Germans who moved up unseen in the fog; garrisons in the various keeps and redoubts had been surrounded. Many parties inflicted heavy losses on the Germans, despite attacks on their trenches with flame throwers. Some surrounded units surrendered once cut off, after running out of ammunition and having had many casualties; others fought to the last man. ⇒第5方面軍の「前方地帯」は、攻略と防御が完了した唯一の地域であった。大部分の兵士が、霧の中に姿を隠したドイツ軍によって捕囚された。さまざまな要塞や砦の守備隊が包囲されていた。多くの部隊が、(砲撃でなく)火炎放射器を使った塹壕攻撃にもかかわらず、ドイツ軍に大きな損害を与えた。包囲された部隊の幾つかは、一旦弾薬を使い果たした後打ちのめされ、多くの死傷者を抱えて降伏した。他の部隊は最後の1人になるまで戦った。 >German A7V tank in Roye, Somme, 26 March 1918 In the Third Army area, German troops broke through during the morning, along the Cambrai–Bapaume road in the Boursies–Louverval area and through the weak defences of the 59th Division near Bullecourt. By the close of the day, the Germans had broken through the British Forward Zone and entered the Battle Zone on most of the attack front and had advanced through the Battle Zone, on the right flank of the Fifth Army, from Tergnier on the Oise river to Seraucourt-le-Grand. South-west of St. Quentin in the 36th Division area, the 9th Irish Fusiliers war diary record noted that there had been many casualties, three battalions of the Forward Zone had been lost and three battalions in the Battle Zone were reduced to 250 men each, leaving only the three reserve battalions relatively intact. ⇒ソンム、ロィエのドイツ軍A7V戦車隊、1918年3月26日 第3方面軍地域では、ドイツ軍が朝の間にブルシエ‐ルベルバル地域のカンブレ‐バポーム道とブレクール近くの第59師団の弱い防御域を強行軍突破した。その日の終わるまでに、ドイツ軍は英国軍の前方部隊を突破し、攻撃前線の大部分で戦闘地帯に突入し、第5方面軍右翼の戦闘地帯を通ってオワーズ川のテルニエからスロクール‐ル‐グランまで進軍した。第36師団地区のサン・ケンタン南西に位置する第9アイルランド火打ち石銃兵隊の戦争日誌によれば、多くの犠牲者があり、前方地帯の3個大隊が失われ、戦闘地帯の3個大隊はそれぞれ250人に減って、3個予備大隊だけが比較的無傷で残った。

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