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Footnotes and appendices in the History of the Great War, show that far from neglecting Haig's desire to concentrate on the Gheluvelt plateau, Gough put a disproportionate amount of the Fifth Army artillery at the disposal of II Corps for the  3   1⁄3 divisions engaged on 31 July, compared to four divisions with two engaged and two in reserve in the other corps, with an average of 19 percent of the Fifth Army artillery each. The green line for II Corps was the shallowest, from a depth of 1,000 yards (910 m) on the southern flank at Klein Zillibeke, to 2,500 yards (2,300 m) on the northern flank along the Ypres–Roulers railway. The green line from the southern flank of XIX Corps to the northern flank of XIV Corps required an advance of 2,500–3,500 yards (2,300–3,200 m). The French First Army had the 29th Division and 133rd Division of the XXXVI Corps (Lieutenant-General Charles Nollet) and the 1st Division, 2nd Division, 51st Division and 162nd Division of I Corps (Lieutenant-General Paul Lacapelle). The I Corps had suffered many casualties in the Nivelle Offensive but had been recruited mainly from northern France and had been rested from 21 April until 20 June. The XXXVI Corps had garrisoned the North Sea coast since 1915 and had not been involved in the mutinies that took place on the Aisne front. The First Army was given 240 × 75 mm field guns, 277 trench artillery pieces (mostly 58 mm mortars), 176 heavy howitzers and mortars, 136 heavy guns and 64 super-heavy guns and howitzers, 22 being of 305 mm or more, 893 guns and mortars for 4.3 miles (7 km) of front. The 1re Armée had relieved the Belgian 4th Division and 5th Division from Boesinghe to Nordschoote from 5–10 July. The 1re Armée was to advance with the 1st and 51st divisions of I Corps on the left of the Fifth Army as flank protection against a German counter-attack from the north. The operation involved a substantial advance over difficult country, to capture the peninsula between the floods at the Martjevaart/St. Jansbeek stream and the land between there and the Yser Canal south of Noordshoote.

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>Footnotes and appendices in the History of the Great War, show that far from neglecting Haig's desire to concentrate on the Gheluvelt plateau, Gough put a disproportionate amount of the Fifth Army artillery at the disposal of II Corps for the  3 1⁄3 divisions engaged on 31 July, compared to four divisions with two engaged and two in reserve in the other corps, with an average of 19 percent of the Fifth Army artillery each*. ⇒『第一次世界大戦の歴史』の脚注や付録で、ゴフは、ゲルヴェルト台地に集中したいというヘイグの願望を怠る状況からほど遠く不相応なほど大量の第5方面軍砲兵隊を第II軍団の用に供した、と示されている。それというのも、他の軍団では、擁する4個師団のうちの2個をもって2回の交戦を行い、残る2個は予備にするのと比較して、(また、通常)第5方面軍各砲兵隊の平均(出動率)19%と比較して、7月31日には31⁄3個師団が交戦したからである*。 *正確な訳であるかどうか、いまいち自信ありません。誤訳の節はお詫びします。 >The green line for II Corps was the shallowest, from a depth of 1,000 yards (910 m) on the southern flank at Klein Zillibeke (→Zillebeke), to 2,500 yards (2,300 m) on the northern flank along the Ypres–Roulers railway. The green line from the southern flank of XIX Corps to the northern flank of XIV Corps required an advance of 2,500–3,500 yards (2,300–3,200 m). ⇒第II軍団の担当する緑線部は、クライン・ズィレベケの1,000ヤード(910m)の深さからイープル–ルーラー鉄道に沿った北側面の2,500ヤード(2,300m)までという、最も浅いところ(奥行き)であった。第XIX軍団の南側面から第XIV軍団の北側面までの緑線部は、2,500–3,500ヤード(2,300–3,200m)の進軍を必要とした。 >The French First Army had the 29th Division and 133rd Division of the XXXVI Corps (Lieutenant-General Charles Nollet) and the 1st Division, 2nd Division, 51st Division and 162nd Division of I Corps (Lieutenant-General Paul Lacapelle). The I Corps had suffered many casualties in the Nivelle Offensive but had been recruited mainly from northern France and had been rested from 21 April until 20 June. ⇒フランス第1方面軍は、第XXXVI軍団(シャルル・ノィエ中将)の第29師団と第133師団、および第I軍団(ポール・ラカペル中将)の第1師団、第2師団、第51師団、第162師団を擁していた。第I軍団は、ニヴェーユ攻勢で多くの犠牲者を出して苦しんだが、主に北フランスで新兵を補充し、4月21日から6月20日まで休養した。 >The XXXVI Corps had garrisoned the North Sea coast since 1915 and had not been involved in the mutinies that took place on the Aisne front. The First Army was given 240 × 75 mm field guns, 277 trench artillery pieces (mostly 58 mm mortars), 176 heavy howitzers and mortars, 136 heavy guns and 64 super-heavy guns and howitzers, 22 being of 305 mm or more, 893 guns and mortars for 4.3 miles (7 km) of front. ⇒第XXXVI軍団は、1915年以降北海沿岸に守備隊を置いて、エーン前線で起こった反乱には関与しなかった。第1方面軍は、240門の75ミリ野戦砲、277門の対塹壕砲(大部分は58ミリ迫撃砲)、176門の大型榴弾砲と迫撃砲、136門の大型銃砲と64門の超大型銃砲と榴弾砲(うち22門は305ミリかそれ以上)、前線4.3マイル(7キロ)のための893門の銃砲と迫撃砲を与えられていた。 >The 1re Armée had relieved the Belgian 4th Division and 5th Division from Boesinghe to Nordschoote from 5–10 July. The 1re Armée was to advance with the 1st and 51st divisions of I Corps on the left of the Fifth Army as flank protection against a German counter-attack from the north. The operation involved a substantial advance over difficult country, to capture the peninsula between the floods at the Martjevaart/St. Jansbeek stream and the land between there and the Yser Canal south of Noordshoote. ⇒フランス第1方面軍は、7月5–10日に、ボージンゲからノールドショーテまでのベルギー軍第4師団と第5師団を救援した。その第1方面軍は、北からのドイツ軍の反撃に対する側面防御隊として、第5方面軍左翼上に婦人する第I軍団の第1師団および第51師団とともに進軍することになっていた。その作戦行動には、マルジェヴァート/サン・ヤンスビーク川と冠水地の間の半島や、その場所とノールドショーテ南のイゼール運河との間の土地を攻略するために、相当に難しい田園での進軍が含まれていた。

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