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The armies were to capture Passchendaele Ridge and advance on Roulers and Thourout, to cut the railway supplying the German garrisons holding the Western Front north of Ypres and the Belgian coast. An attack by the Fourth Army would then begin on the coast, combined with Operation Hush (including an amphibious landing) in support of the main advance to the Netherlands frontier. On 13 May, Haig appointed General Hubert Gough to command the Ypres operation and the coastal force; Macmullen gave Gough the GHQ 1917 plan the next day. Entente offensive preparations Gough held meetings with his Corps commanders on 6 and 16 June where the third objective of the GHQ 1917 plan, which included the German Wilhelm Stellung (third line), was added to the first and second objectives to be taken on the first day. A fourth objective was also given for the first day but was only to be attempted opportunistically, in places where the German defence had collapsed. Gough intended to use five divisions from the Second Army, nine divisions and one brigade from the Fifth Army and two divisions from the French First Army (1re Armée). Gough planned a preparatory bombardment from 16–25 July. The Second Army was to create the impression of a more ambitious attack beyond Messines Ridge, by capturing outposts in the Warneton line. The Fifth Army was to attack along a front of approximately 14,000 yards (13,000 m), running from Klein Zillebeke in the south to the Ypres–Staden railway in the north, with the French First Army on the northern flank attacking with two divisions, from the boundary with the XIV Corps north to the flooded area just beyond Steenstraat. The infantry trained on a replica of the German trench system, built using information from aerial photographs and trench raids. Specialist platoons were given additional training on methods to destroy German pillboxes and blockhouses. The attack was not a breakthrough attempt, for the German fourth-line defensive position (the Flandern I Stellung), lay 10,000–12,000 yards (9,100–11,000 m) behind the front line, well beyond the fourth objective (red line).

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>The armies were to capture Passchendaele Ridge and advance on Roulers and Thourout, to cut the railway supplying the German garrisons holding the Western Front north of Ypres and the Belgian coast. An attack by the Fourth Army would then begin on the coast, combined with Operation Hush (including an amphibious landing) in support of the main advance to the Netherlands frontier. On 13 May, Haig appointed General Hubert Gough to command the Ypres operation and the coastal force; Macmullen gave Gough the GHQ 1917 plan the next day. ⇒方面軍は、パッシェンデール・リッジを攻略して、ルーラーとツールートに向かって進軍し、イープル北やベルギー沿岸の西部戦線を占拠しているドイツ駐屯軍に供給している鉄道を切断することになっていた。それから、第4方面軍による攻撃を沿岸で始めて、オランダ国境への主要な進軍を支持して「ハッシュ作戦行動」(陸海空共同の上陸を含む)と結合される手はずであった。5月13日に、ヘイグはヒューバート・ゴフ将軍にイープル活動と沿岸の軍団を指揮するよう任命した。その翌日マクミューレンがGHQ 1917年計画をゴフに伝えた。 >Entente offensive preparations Gough held meetings with his Corps commanders on 6 and 16 June where the third objective of the GHQ 1917 plan, which included the German Wilhelm Stellung (third line), was added to the first and second objectives to be taken on the first day. A fourth objective was also given for the first day but was only to be attempted opportunistically, in places where the German defence had collapsed. ⇒協商国軍の攻勢準備 ゴフは6月6日と16日に彼の部隊指揮官との会談を開き、第1日目に実行されるものとして、ドイツ軍のウィルヘルム陣地(第3戦線)を含むGHQ 1917年計画の第3標的を第1、第2標的に加えた。ドイツ軍守備隊が崩壊した場所では、第4標的も1日目に組み込まれたが、それはもっぱら状況を見て試みられることになっていた。 >Gough intended to use five divisions from the Second Army, nine divisions and one brigade from the Fifth Army and two divisions from the French First Army (1re Armée). Gough planned a preparatory bombardment from 16–25 July. The Second Army was to create the impression of a more ambitious attack beyond Messines Ridge, by capturing outposts in the Warneton line. ⇒ゴフは、フランス軍の第2方面軍から5個師団を、第5方面軍から9個師団と1個旅団を、第1師団から2個師団を、それぞれ集めて使うつもりであった。ゴフは7月16–25日に予備爆撃を予定した。第2方面軍はヴァルネトン戦線の前哨基地を攻略することによって、メッシネス・リッジを越える、より野心的な攻撃の印象を作り出すことにしていた。 >The Fifth Army was to attack along a front of approximately 14,000 yards (13,000 m), running from Klein Zillebeke in the south to the Ypres–Staden railway in the north, with the French First Army on the northern flank attacking with two divisions, from the boundary with the XIV Corps north to the flooded area just beyond Steenstraat. The infantry trained on a replica of the German trench system, built using information from aerial photographs and trench raids. Specialist platoons were given additional training on methods to destroy German pillboxes and blockhouses. ⇒第5方面軍は、南のクライン・ズィレベケから北のイープル–シュターデン鉄道までを通して、およそ14,000ヤード(13,000m)の前線に沿って攻撃するとともに、北側面のフランス第1方面軍は、2個師団をもって、第XIV部隊担当の国境線から北のシュテーンシュトラートを越えた冠水地域までを攻撃することになっていた。歩兵連隊は航空写真と塹壕急襲からの情報を使って、レプリカ上で攻撃訓練をした。(そのうちの)専門小隊はドイツ軍のピルボックスと要塞を破壊するための方法に関して、さらなる訓練が施された。 >The attack was not a breakthrough attempt, for the German fourth-line defensive position (the Flandern I Stellung), lay 10,000–12,000 yards (9,100–11,000 m) behind the front line, well beyond the fourth objective (red line). ⇒攻撃は全面突破の試みではなかったが、それというのも、ドイツ軍の第4防御戦線の陣地(フランドル第I陣地)は、第4標的(赤線部)を十分に越えて、最前線の10,000–12,000ヤード(9,100–11,000m)背後に位置していたからであった。

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