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As news arrived of the great success of the attack, Brigadier-General Charteris, head of GHQ Intelligence, went from Haig's advanced headquarters to the Second Army Headquarters to discuss a possible exploitation. Plumer declined the suggestion, as eight fresh German divisions were behind the battlefield with another six beyond them. Plumer preferred to wait until the expected German counter-attacks had been defeated, as Haig had directed. German artillery fire was heavy and the defences of the Flandern II and Flandern III stellungen could be garrisoned by German divisions behind the attack front. An attack on these fortifications would need artillery support, which would be limited, given that the British field artillery was behind a severely battered strip of muddy ground 2 mi (3.2 km) deep, firing close to the limit of their range. Later in the day, Plumer had second thoughts and ordered I Anzac Corps to push on to the Keiberg spur, with support from II Anzac Corps. Lieutenant-General Alexander Godley the II Anzac Corps commander, wanted to advance north-eastwards, towards Passchendaele village but Lieutenant-General William Birdwood of I Anzac Corps, wanted to wait until artillery had been brought up and supply routes improved. The X Corps commander, Lieutenant-General Thomas Morland proposed an attack northwards, from In de Ster into the southern flank of the Germans opposite I Anzac Corps, which was opposed by Major-General Herbert Shoubridge the 7th Division commander, due to uncertainty and the many casualties in the 21st Division on his right flank. At 2:00 p.m. Plumer decided that exploitation was not possible. At 10:30 a.m., Gough told the Fifth Army corps commanders to push on and to attack again at 5:00 p.m. but when reports arrived of a repulse of the 4th Division at 19 Metre Hill, at the junction of XVIII and XIV Corps, the attack was cancelled. The capture of the ridges was a great success, Plumer called the attack "... the greatest victory since the Marne" and the German Official History referred to "... the black day of October 4". There had been an average advance of 1,000 yd (910 m) and the 3rd Australian Division moved forward up to 1,900 yd (1,700 m).

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>As news arrived of the great success of the attack, Brigadier-General Charteris, head of GHQ Intelligence, went from Haig's advanced headquarters to the Second Army Headquarters to discuss a possible exploitation. Plumer declined the suggestion, as eight fresh German divisions were behind the battlefield with another six beyond them. Plumer preferred to wait until the expected German counter-attacks had been defeated, as Haig had directed. ⇒攻撃大成功のニュースが到着したとき、GHQ(総司令部)諜報部の長官、チャータリス准将は可能な開発利用を議論するために、ヘイグの前進本部から第2方面軍本部へ出向いた。新しいドイツ軍8個師団が戦場背後の別の6個師団とともに控えていたので、プルマーは提案を固辞した。ヘイグが指名して(考えを)求めたが、プルマーはむしろ、予想されるドイツ軍の反撃が敗退するまで(開発)は待機することを望んだ。 >German artillery fire was heavy and the defences of the Flandern II and Flandern III stellungen could be garrisoned by German divisions behind the attack front. An attack on these fortifications would need artillery support, which would be limited, given that the British field artillery was behind a severely battered strip of muddy ground 2 mi (3.2 km) deep, firing close to the limit of their range. ⇒ドイツ軍の大砲火は重く、フランドル第II陣地およびフランドル第III陣地の防御のために、攻撃前線背後にあるドイツ軍の数個師団によって(その中から)守備隊を駐屯させることができた。これらの要塞を攻撃するには、砲兵隊からの支援が必要であったが、英国軍の野戦砲は、奥行き2マイル(3.2キロ)のひどくどろどろした傾斜地の背後の一角にあったので、射程範囲の限界に近づいて射撃するには制限があった。 >Later in the day, Plumer had second thoughts and ordered I Anzac Corps to push on to the Keiberg spur, with support from II Anzac Corps. Lieutenant-General Alexander Godley the II Anzac Corps commander, wanted to advance north-eastwards, towards Passchendaele village but Lieutenant-General William Birdwood of I Anzac Corps, wanted to wait until artillery had been brought up and supply routes improved. ⇒その日遅くに、プルマーが第2の考えを抱いて、第IIアンザック軍団の支援を得てケイベルク山脚を突撃するよう第Iアンザック軍団に命じた。第IIアンザック軍団の指揮官、アレキサンダー・ゴドレー中将は、パッシェンデール村へ向って北東に進むことを望んだが、第Iアンザック軍団のウィリアム・バードウッド中将は砲兵隊がやって来て、供給ルートが改善するのを待つことを望んだ。 >The X Corps commander, Lieutenant-General Thomas Morland proposed an attack northwards, from In de Ster into the southern flank of the Germans opposite I Anzac Corps, which was opposed by Major-General Herbert Shoubridge the 7th Division commander, due to uncertainty and the many casualties in the 21st Division on his right flank. ⇒第X軍団の指揮官、トーマス・モーランド中将は、イン・デ・スターから北に向かって、第Iアンザック軍団に対峙するドイツ軍の南側面を攻撃することを提案したが、第7師団の指揮官、ハーバート・ショーブリッジ少将は、不確実性と自軍右側面の第21師団に多くの死傷者数があったために反対した。 >At 2:00 p.m. Plumer decided that exploitation was not possible. At 10:30 a.m., Gough told the Fifth Army corps commanders to push on and to attack again at 5:00 p.m. but when reports arrived of a repulse of the 4th Division at 19 Metre Hill, at the junction of XVIII and XIV Corps, the attack was cancelled. ⇒プルマーは、午後2時に開発利用は可能ではないと決意した。午前10時30分に、ゴフは、第5方面軍の司令官らに対して午後5時に前進して再び攻撃するように言ったが、第XVIIIと第XIV軍団の接合地点の19メートル・ヒルで第4師団が撃隊されたとの報告が到着した時点で、攻撃は中止された。 >The capture of the ridges was a great success, Plumer called the attack "... the greatest victory since the Marne" and the German Official History referred to "... the black day of October 4". There had been an average advance of 1,000 yd (910 m) and the 3rd Australian Division moved forward up to 1,900 yd (1,700 m). ⇒尾根の攻略は大成功だったので、プルマーはその攻撃を「…マルヌ以来の最大の勝利」と呼び、ドイツの公報史家は「…10月4日の黒い日」と言及した。平均的な進軍は1,000ヤード(910m)であったが、第3オーストラリア師団は最高1,900ヤード(1,700m)まで進軍した。

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